Judge Rinder ‘in shock’ after being robbed by ‘three boys in balaclavas’

Incident happened in South Hampstead

Ellie Harrison
Thursday 25 March 2021 07:17
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TV judge Robert Rinder has posted a plea for help after his mobile phone was stolen in the street.

The star claimed his phone was “grabbed out of my hands by three boys wearing balaclavas” while he was out in London on Wednesday night (24 March).

He offered a reward to anyone who could provide information that would help, writing on Twitter: “I’ve just had my phone grabbed out my hands by 3 boys wearing balaclavas on bikes (Finchley Road & Canfield gardens). They laughed as I shouted to drop it.”

Rinder added: “I’m in shock but am insured & privileged. Others are less lucky. Help me find these people & stop them (financial reward).”

He later posted: “The ‘privilege’ is knowing that I can sort this out and get it replaced. As you know, our phones are lifelines to friends & family (especially in lockdown). For thousands of other victims this means being cut off or losing a fortune. Thanks for your love.”

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Television stars flocked to support him, with newsreader Krishnan Guru-Murthy tweeting: “You poor thing! What absolute b******s. Main thing is you’re ok. Tried texting you but…..doh. Call if you need anything.”

The London Metropolitan Police told Metro.co.uk in a statement: “Police are investigating after receiving a report of a theft at approximately 20.40 hrs on Wednesday, 24 March on Finchley Road. Three males dressed in black approached the victim and took his mobile phone. Enquiries are on-going. No arrests at this early stage.”

The incident is one of a few of high-profile celebrity muggings to have taken place in London in recent years. In 2019, classical singer Katherine Jenkins was mugged in south-west London after she intervened in a “vicious” street robbery.

And last year, Harry Styles was robbed at knifepoint in north London during a night out on Valentine’s Day.

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