Pakistan TV anchor continues to present as huge earthquake shakes studio

Earthquake stikes Afghanistan and Pakistan and leaves at least 13 people dead

Sravasti Dasgupta
Wednesday 22 March 2023 09:23 GMT
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TV presenter continues to read news as earthquake shakes studio in Pakistan

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The video of a Pakistan television anchor continuing to present a news broadcast as a powerful earthquake shook the studio, has gone viral on social media.

On Tuesday night, a 6.5-magnitude earthquake struck Afghanistan and Pakistan, killing at least 13 people and injuring 300.

The 30-second video was shared on social media by Pakistani journalist Iftikhar Firdous.

Pashto TV channel Mahshriq TV anchor could be seen calmly presenting the news as tremors jolted the studio in Peshawar, Pakistan.

A Twitter user shared the video with the caption: “Pashto TV channel Mahshriq TV during the earthquake. Bravo anchor continued his live program in the ongoing earthquake.”

Television screens and other studio equipment could be seen shaking behind the anchor as he continued with the broadcast.

The video has been shared widely on social media, with users applauding the anchor for keeping calm.

“Incredibly brave of him to keep his calm and carry on doing his job,” wrote journalist Natiq Malikzada.

“Kept his cool all along, what a pro,” wrote Dawn news journalist Zoheb Ahmed Majeed.

The powerful earthquake was felt across an area more than 1,000km wide.

The earthquake led people to leave their houses, and triggered landslides in some mountainous areas, reported the Associated Press.

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said that tremors were felt in northern India, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan.

The epicenter of the quake was in southeast Afghanistan’s Jurm valley.

Huge parts of south Asia are seismically active because a tectonic plate known as the Indian plate is pushing north into the Eurasian plate.

Last year, more than 1,000 people were killed in eastern Afghanistan after a 6.1-magnitude earthquake.

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