Videos show scale of flash flooding as rain finally hits parched UK, with warnings of more to come

Heatwaves over last few weeks have made the ground very dry and hence more susceptible to flooding, experts say

Maroosha Muzaffar
Tuesday 16 August 2022 09:05 BST
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Cornwall roundabout flooded amid heavy rainfall

Videos have emerged showing the scale of the flash flooding that hit several parts of the UK on Monday, the result of heavy downpours after many weeks of exceptionally dry conditions.

Experts say the record-breaking heatwaves over the last few weeks have left the ground extremely hard and dry and hence more susceptible to flooding.

Local reports said that heavy rainfall and flash flooding hit some parts of Devon and Cornwall as thunderstorms swept across the South West and East of England.

One of the videos shared on social media shows a roundabout near a river in Truro, Cornwall quickly flooding as showers swept in.

The UK government’s Check for Flooding website mentions that there are 11 flood alerts at the moment in England. It says that “local flooding is possible from surface water across parts of England on Monday and Tuesday and across parts of the south of England on Wednesday.”

The officials have warned that properties may flood and there may be travel disruption. “Local flooding is also possible but not expected from rivers across parts of England on Tuesday and Wednesday. Land, roads and some properties may flood and there may be travel disruption.”

The Met department has warned that there will be an “incredible deluge” over the next few days. A yellow warning for thunderstorms is also in place across the UK on Tuesday and in the south of England on Wednesday, the department said.

However, meteorologists said it was not clear exactly where the storms would strike.

As the rains finally arrived, roads were soon flooded in Launceston, Cornwall, and Devon, local media reported.

Grahame Madge, a Met Office spokesman, told the Telegraph that “if people know that properties may have flooded before it might be the time just to be ready – have a clear up, put any valuables at a higher level.”

He added that: “It could be as simple and as fundamental as that so that if you do have to move quickly you are already halfway prepared. It’s incredibly challenging to identify where you are going to get the most extreme events.”

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