Canada’s Justin Trudeau could stay in power until 2025 after Liberal-NDP deal

In exchange for meeting certain policy requests, the NDP has promised not to move a vote of no confidence in the Liberal minority government

Johanna Chisholm
Wednesday 23 March 2022 19:36
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Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau has struck a deal that would see the New Democrat Party support his Liberal minority government until 2025, according to reports.

The momentous agreement, which was originally reported by Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper, will see the left-wing NDP prop up the Liberal minority government on the promise of delivering on climate and health policies near to NDP leader Jagmeet Singh’s heart through to 2025.

“I’ve thought long and hard about this,” the prime minister said while speaking to reporters outside parliament early Tuesday morning.

“What this means is that during this uncertain time the government can function with predictability and stability, present and implement budgets, and get this done,” Mr Trudeau added.

As part of the newly reached agreement was a centrepiece programme on national dental care.

The NDP’s Mr Singh said on Instagram that it would be one of Canada’s largest healthcare initiatives since medicare was introduced.

“New Democrats will always use our power to make life better for Canadians. Tommy Douglas did it with Medicare. Jack Layton did it with affordable housing. Now we’re using our power to deliver the biggest expansion of health care in a generation – with Dental Care and Pharmacare,” the NDP leader wrote.

The left-wing political party has long championed pushing a national dental care policy, arguing that it would improve the lives of Canada’s most vulnerable – namely the uninsured, low-income and seniors.

This programme is not, however, the same as a fully universal dental programme, as it’s limited to families with an income of less than C$90,000 (£54,079).

In exchange for meeting Mr Singh on certain policy requests, the NDP has promised not to move a vote of no confidence in the Liberal minority government.

In September 2021, Mr Trudeau failed in his bid to win a Liberal majority government after a low-energy election campaign in the middle of a pandemic. This was the Liberal leader’s second straight minority government, which in Canada’s political system translates to only being able to pass bills with the backing of the majority of the House of Commons.

The current breakdown of the house has Mr Trudeau’s Liberals holding 159 of the 338-seat lower chamber, with the Conservatives holding 119, followed by the NDP with 25 and the remaining being held by smaller political parties.

Opposition parties were swift to condemn the news of Mr Singh’s and Mr Trudeau’s newly announced deal, labelling the cooperation an undemocratic “coalition” and a “desperate” attempt for the current prime minister to “cling to power”.

Interim Conservative leader Candice Bergen wasted no time to slam the deal.

“I believe it goes to the heart of our democracy,” Ms Bergen said, according to CBC.

“The Liberals and the NDP had and have an obligation to be honest and transparent and tell Canadians this is what they’ve been cooking up, and they didn’t do that. They cannot be trusted.”

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