Calls for Ivanka’s January 6 texts to be released as Lindsey Graham reveals she was conduit to Trump

‘This thing is going south. This is not good. You’re going to have to tell these people to stand down,’ senator told then-president’s daughter

Gustaf Kilander
Washington, DC
Tuesday 14 December 2021 22:30
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Related video: Meadows Texts Prove Hannity, Don Jr. And Others Wanted Trump to Stop Jan. 6 Riot

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Calls have been issued for Ivanka Trump’s texts from January 6, the day of the insurrection, to be released after South Carolina Republican Senator Lindsey Graham revealed she was a conduit to then-President Donald Trump.

Texts handed over to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot by former Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows before he ceased his cooperation with the committee have revealed that Fox News hosts and Mr Trump’s eldest son Donald Trump Jr texted Mr Meadows on January 6 urging him to get Mr Trump to call off his supporters and tell them to go home.

Mr Graham has said that he didn’t text with Mr Meadows on January 6, but told CNN’s Manu Raju that he spoke with Ivanka Trump and asked her to send a message to her father to “tell his people to leave”.

“I want to see what Jared and Ivanka were texting to Meadows,” Lincoln Project co-founder Rick Wilson tweeted on Monday.

“So disappointed there were no texts read by the 1/6 committee from Ivanka begging her daddy to tell them to stop,” Twitter user Barbara Melmet wrote.

“Sounds like Ivanka’s phone records need to be subpoenaed if they haven’t already been. Who else reached POTUS through her?” Kevin Goebel added.

The Washington Post reported on 31 October that Mr Graham repeatedly called Ms Trump with suggestions for what Mr Trump should say to get his supporters to stand down.

“You need to get these people out of here,” Mr Graham told her. “This thing is going south. This is not good. You’re going to have to tell these people to stand down. Stand down.”

The paper reported that Ms Trump went between her office in the West Wing on the second floor of the White House where she saw the insurrection take place on TV and the president’s dining room, where Mr Trump was watching the events.

At 2.38pm on January 6, Mr Trump tweeted: “Please support our Capitol Police and Law Enforcement. They are truly on the side of our Country. Stay peaceful!”

Ms Trump tried to get Mr Trump to use more forceful language to get his supporters to back off. But when she finally thought she had convinced her father, Mr Meadows would call her to say that wasn’t the case.

“I need you to come back down here. We’ve got to get this under control,” Mr Meadows told Ms Trump numerous times.

At 3.13pm, Mr Trump tweeted again, writing: “I am asking for everyone at the U.S. Capitol to remain peaceful. No violence! Remember, WE are the Party of Law & Order – respect the Law and our great men and women in Blue. Thank you!”

His inner circle still didn’t think this was enough. At 3.15pm, Ms Trump retweeted Mr Trump’s message and added: “American Patriots - any security breach or disrespect to our law enforcement is unacceptable. The violence must stop immediately. Please be peaceful.”

She quickly deleted it after being roundly slammed for addressing the rioters as “patriots”.

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