Kim Jong Un 'scales' highest North Korea mountain to honour his dead father

Kim said he was more energised than nuclear weapons after the ascent

Lamiat Sabin
Sunday 19 April 2015 14:41
Comments
Kim Jong-un posing on top of Mount Paektu in North Korea
Kim Jong-un posing on top of Mount Paektu in North Korea

Kim Jong-un has climbed the highest mountain in North Korea to honour his late father, according to state media.

The leader of the insular country said that the expedition to the summit on the border of China gave him more energy than what would be used in nuclear weaponry.

Pictures made available by the Korean Central News Agency appear to show the leader on top of Mount Paektu – his father Kim Jong-il’s alleged birthplace – surrounded by snow just as the sun was setting behind the 9,002-ft (2,744 metre) high peak.

“Climbing Mt Paektu provides precious mental pabulum more powerful than any kind of nuclear weapon,” the Rodong Sinmun newspaper quoted him as having said.

North Korea possesses the least nuclear weapons out of eight other countries, which are, in order of amount – USA, Russia, UK, France, China, India, Pakistan and Israel. This is according to Stockholm International Peace Research Institute data.

Kim taking in the view from the highest point in North Korea

Kim was at the volcanic mountain on Saturday to commemorate the death of his father, who died in 2011 after 17 years of rule.

Jong-un, who boasts of many alleged talents, is a frequent visitor of Mt Paektu.

Earlier this month, it was claimed by North Korean state media that action man Kim could drive a car by the age of three.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in