One China principle is not negotiable, Foreign Ministry says in response to Donald Trump comments

Beijing sees principle as political foundation underlying all external relations 

Will Worley@willrworley
Sunday 15 January 2017 09:34
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The national flags of Taiwan (L) and the US (R) hanging outside the Imperial Hotel Taipei in Taipei, Taiwan, 14 January 2017. Diplomatic relations between the United States and the Asian region are expected to change as US President-elect Donald Trump has said that the 'One China' policy on Taiwan is up for negotiation under his administration.
The national flags of Taiwan (L) and the US (R) hanging outside the Imperial Hotel Taipei in Taipei, Taiwan, 14 January 2017. Diplomatic relations between the United States and the Asian region are expected to change as US President-elect Donald Trump has said that the 'One China' policy on Taiwan is up for negotiation under his administration.

The ‘One China’ principle is non-negotiable, the country’s foreign ministry has said, adding that it forms the political foundation for relations with the US.

The ministry also urged “relevant parties” to be aware of the sensitivity of the Taiwan issue, which is central to the One China principle.

The remarks come in response to Donald Trump’s recent comments to the Wall Street Journal, in which he said that the US approach to One China was up for negotiation -- a statement which most likely caused anxiety in Beijing.

One China has been acknowledged by the US since 1979, when President Jimmy Carter developed closer ties with Beijing, at the expense of contact with Taiwan. He was the last US president to speak to a Taiwanese leader.

The US has since followed the One China policy in international relations, officially accepting Beijing as the only legitimate Chinese government.

The President-elect’s brazen rhetoric in regards to Taiwan has troubled the Chinese government, who have claimed the island for its own since 1949 – giving rise to the One China principle.

In December 2016, Mr Trump accepted a congratulatory telephone call from Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen.

Soon after, in a further insult to China, he tweeted: “The President of Taiwan CALLED ME today to wish me congratulations on winning the Presidency. Thank you!”

He went on: "Interesting how the US sells Taiwan billions of dollars of military equipment but I should not accept a congratulatory call."

The Chinese government responded that it was “seriously concerned” by Mr Trump’s approach, which they said threatened their sovereignty and territorial integrity.

Throughout his election campaign, Mr Trump was frequently critical of China, accusing the country of engaging in a "trade war" against the US.

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