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‘We do not recognise Ukraine as the enemy’: Russian newspaper to publish in Ukranian following invasion

‘We all gathered at the editorial office early today. We are in grief,’ editor-in-chief says

Zoe Tidman
Thursday 24 February 2022 18:02 GMT
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Dmitry Muratov said Novaya Gazeta would publish in both Russian and Ukranian following the invasion
Dmitry Muratov said Novaya Gazeta would publish in both Russian and Ukranian following the invasion (AFP via Getty Images)

A Russian newspaper editor who won the Nobel Peace Prize last year has said he will publish an edition in Ukranian as a show of solidarity against Putin's invasion.

Dmitry Muratov, who was recognised last year for fighting for freedom of expression, said he felt "grief" and "shame" after Russian troops attacked on Thursday.

Mr Muratov said he will publish Novaya Gazeta in both Russian and Ukranian to show the newspaper did not consider the under-siege country as "an enemy".

Russian moved in on Ukraine in the early hours of Thursday after the threat had loomed for weeks. Forces fired missiles at several Ukrainian cities and landed troops on its south coast, after Vladimir Putin authorised what he called a special military operation in the east.

“We all gathered at the editorial office early today. We are in grief,” Mr Muratov said in a statement on Thursday morning.

“Our country, on the orders of President Putin, started a war with Ukraine. And there is no one to stop the war. Therefore, along with grief, we and I experience shame.”

Russian troop movements and reported explosions in Ukraine (Press Association Images)

He added: “But we will publish this issue of Novaya Gazeta in two languages ​​- Ukrainian and Russian. Because we do not recognize Ukraine as an enemy, and the Ukrainian language as the language of the enemy. And we will never admit it.

“Only the anti-war movement of the Russians can save life on this planet.”

Mr Muratov won the Nobel Peace Prize last summer along with journalist Maria Ressa, with both commended for their “courageous fight for freedom of expression”.

This made him the first Russian to win the prestigious award since Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev – who himself helped set up Novaya Gazeta with his Nobel Peace Prize money in 1990.

Dozens of people have died after Russia launched its attack on Ukraine, where police said fighting was going on across almost everywhere throughout the country on Thursday.

Russian forces fired missiles at several Ukrainian cities and landed troops on its south coast on Thursday, after Vladimir Putin authorised what he called a special military operation in the east.

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