Spain travel rules: What are the latest restrictions for holidaymakers?

Here are the current entry rules for British tourists

<p>A view of Ibiza Island in the Balearic Islands, Spain</p>

A view of Ibiza Island in the Balearic Islands, Spain

Spain is Brits’ favourite holiday destination, attracting shedloads of tourists to its Canary and Balearic Islands, popular Costa del Sol beaches and vibrant cities, from buzzy Barcelona to foodie paradise San Sebastian.

Unlike other European nations, it continues to uphold its Covid-related entry requirements for travellers.

Here’s everything you need to know before you go.

Do I need proof of vaccination or a test to visit Spain?

Yes. Travellers aged 12 and over must show valid proof of one of the following:

  • being fully vaccinated
  • a negative Covid test: either a PCR taken within 72 hours prior to departure, or an antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to departure
  • having recovered from Covid in the last six months. You can use a medical certificate or recovery record to prove your Covid status on entry to Spain

The definition of “fully vaccinated” will depend on your age and the length of time since your last dose. If you’ve received a booster jab, you’re considered fully vaccinated for entry into Spain, regardless of when it was administered.

However, those aged 18 or over who have not received a booster but have received two doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a single-dose vaccine programme are only considered fully vaccinated if the second jab was administered no more than 270 days prior to entering Spain. The second dose must also have been received at least 14 days prior.

Those aged 12 to 17 don’t need to have received a booster, just two doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a single-dose vaccine. They continue to qualify as fully vaccinated more than 270 days after their last dose.

Children under the age of 12 years old do not need to show proof of being fully vaccinated on entry to Spain, nor take a test.

Do I need to fill in a passenger locator form for Spain?

It depends on your vaccination status.

Travellers from the UK who can either show proof of being fully vaccinated or of having recovered from Covid in the last six months, plus those aged under 12 years old, do not need to complete Spain’s Travel Health Control form.

Everyone else must complete Spain’s Travel Health Control form no more than 48 hours before travel to Spain.

Do I need to wear a mask while on holiday in Spain?

The use of face coverings is mandatory for anyone over the age of six in the following situations:

  • on public transport
  • visiting a hospital or medical centre (including other healthcare settings such as dentists, opticians, pharmacies etc)
  • visiting a care or nursing home

In addition to the mandatory use of face masks in the above situations, the Spanish government recommends you use them responsibly in the following circumstances:

  • enclosed public spaces such as shops, cinemas, bars and restaurants
  • at large events (eg concerts, sporting events)
  • when in the company of people considered clinically vulnerable or high-risk and social distancing of 1.5m cannot be observed
  • at family gatherings
  • in any other enclosed communal spaces open to the public

Has Brexit changed the rules for visiting Spain?

The rule changes that could trip you up on a visit to Spain in 2022 are more likely to be Brexit-related than Covid-related. Since the UK left the European Union, there are new rules regarding length and frequency of visits to countries in the Schengen Area (including Spain), as well as rules around passport stamps and validity.

To visit an EU country post-Brexit, your passport must be:

  • issued less than 10 years before the date you enter the country (check the “date of issue”)
  • valid for at least 3 months after the day you plan to leave (check the “expiry date”)

There is also now a time limit on how long and how often you can visit Spain, visa free. The Foreign Office advises: “You can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa.

“To stay longer, to work or study, for business or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Spanish government’s entry requirements.”

You must also have your passport stamped on arrival and on exit from the country. Make sure this takes place at passport control to avoid any confusion over how long you have been there.

You may also need to show a return or onward ticket to indicate when you are leaving Spain, and could be asked to demonstrate that you have enough money to support yourself for the duration of your stay.

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