<p>An aerial view of the city and harbour of Malaga in Andalucia, Spain</p>

An aerial view of the city and harbour of Malaga in Andalucia, Spain

Spain could impose tighter Covid restrictions in response to ‘worrying’ spread of omicron

Prime Minister to hold emergency meeting on Wednesday

Helen Coffey
Tuesday 21 December 2021 11:00
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Spain could impose stricter Covid-related measures in response to the “worrying” spread of the Omicron coronavirus variant.

The Spanish prime minister has called an emergency meeting with regional presidents on Wednesday 22 December to decide what steps may be necessary.

“The virus is still with us and fighting it must be a priority,” Pedro Sanchez said at a press conference on 19 December.

”The figures in the last few hours, with a cumulative incidence rate of 511 positive tests for every 100,000 inhabitants in 14 days, pose a real risk to the health of our citizens.

“I've decided to call an emergency meeting for Wednesday, 22 December to analyse the evolution of the pandemic and study measures with which to face it.”

He added that the current rate of infection in Spain was “worrying” and called the omicron variant a “wake up call” for the country.

Currently, only fully vaccinated Brits are permitted to enter Spain, although children under 12 are exempt from this requirement.

There is currently no need to present a negative Covid test prior to entry to the country – although tighter measures for travellers could be introduced after the emergency meeting.

Any new Covid restrictions will be announced after the meeting on 22 December, according to Mr Sanchez.

It follows the news that several European countries are stepping up entry restrictions in light of omicron.

Both France and Germany have banned UK travellers from entering: the former has stipulated that Brits must have a “compelling reason” for visiting, while the latter has barred British tourists, business travellers and people making family visits from entering the country. Only German citizens and British residents of Germany are allowed to enter.

Meanwhile, as of 19 December, the Netherlands is back in a nationwide lockdown.

Prime minister Mark Rutte announced the measures on Saturday 18 December, saying a full lockdown was “inevitable with the fifth wave and with omicron spreading even faster than we had feared.

“Omicron is forcing us to limit our number of contacts as quickly as possible, and as much as possible, which is why the Netherlands will be locked [down].”

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