The most powerful passports in the world

Passports were ranked based on cost, and how many countries it provides visa-free entry to

Wednesday 22 April 2015 11:08
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British passports have been ranked the fourth most powerful passports in the world.

This is according to research conducted by transport search comparison site GoEuro, which has ranked different passports based on cost, the number of hours work needed to acquire one, how long the document is valid for, and how many countries it provides visa-free entry to.

Taking these factors into consideration, a British passport is one of the most useful passports in the world, allowing its holder to visit 174 countries visa-free at a cost of just £73. By comparison, the US passport allows entry to the same number of countries but costs £16 more.

Swedish passports were deemed the most valuable with access to 174 countries for just £28, while Afghanistan came in last place, giving its passport holders access to only 28 countries at a cost of £69.

Afghan passport holders must also work 183 hours before they can obtain the document, compared to the one hour of work required in Sweden. British passport holders need to have 11 hours of work under their belts before they can apply.

Turkish passports are the most expensive in the world at £166, while UAE passports are the cheapest, costing a measly £9.

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