In 2023, Ukraine may suffer the same fate as Gaza and Syria

If we tire of this story, of the plight of Ukraine, we risk normalising an invasion of this global scale, writes Bel Trew

Sunday 01 January 2023 18:51 GMT
Comments
It is no coincidence that President Zelensky took the extraordinary step to leave Ukraine for the first time since the war started to visit the US and rally support
It is no coincidence that President Zelensky took the extraordinary step to leave Ukraine for the first time since the war started to visit the US and rally support (Getty)

Few would have thought waking up on 1 January 2022 that the single largest event in Europe’s modern history since the Second World War was just around the corner. That it would unfurl with such devastating rage through all of our lives.

But on 24 February, President Putin decided to subject Ukraine and the planet to this – forging a new world order for all of us for generations to come. It reverberated well past the borders of the two protagonists in this story, igniting everything from bread shortages and near famine to a cost of living crisis.

And so it has been a bewildering year – with Ukraine and the war ravaging her as the centre of gravity. But for how much longer? So devastating has the conflict been, sparking Europe’s worst refugee and humanitarian crisis, that it has unfortunately eclipsed other world catastrophes and other wars. The global spotlight has been on the extraordinary scenes captured in now iconic images and words.

Join our commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in