Arts and Entertainment

Private Alex Stringer, of the Royal Logistic Corps, was 20 when he was blown up in Afghanistan: "The reason I lost my left leg so high up is because the burning paint cooked my left leg all the way down to the bone. But if I hadn't set myself on fire, I would have bled out and died – as a result of it, all the arteries became cauterised".

BOOK REVIEW / Watery draught of Vichy

Brian Moore's late fiction is anorexically insubstantial. By Christophe r Hawtree; The Statement by Brian Moore Bloomsbury, pounds 14.99

A new leaf as Muslims put Rushdie on the spot

DAVID LISTER

LETTER: Headington's stars

From Mr Paul Newnham

When a city suit is just too much

mail-order junkie by Genevieve Fox

BOOK REVIEW / Ten years of lunching

IN THE FIFTIES by Peter Vansittart, John Murray pounds 19.99

Hung up on Julie and Toby

The 'Modern Review' has been shut down by its editor, Toby Young. Can't, says Julie Burchill, its founder. Media folk are taking sides in the mother of all postmodern battles. Phone-lines are hotting up. John Lyttle, a former contributor, fields the calls; Martin Rowson (also ex-MR) pour s oil on troubled waters

OBITUARY : Jan Culik

Jan Culik was born in time still to benefit from the all-round, "classical" education in the tradition of the inter-war, democratic Czechoslovak Republic. This education however failed to prepare the members of his generation for the political cataclysms which were to befall Czechoslovakia from 1939 onwards and left them often rather isolated in the totalitarian decades which were to follow.

LEADING ARTICLE : You can hide, but you sure can't run

One night about a century ago, in the dark and fire and confusion, Jim jumped. Though he might later emerge as "Lord Jim", Conrad's hero was doomed by that moment. He could never return to the centre of things. He would forever wander on the periphery of the world. A hundred years ago, this seemed a terrible fate, something to place a man's humanity under the most searching examination. Where a modern writer might see Jim's subsequent adventures and triumphs in Borneo as the heart of the story, and the preceding catastrophe as merely a device to get him there, Conrad saw that all of this was merely a coda to the primal act of running away: that nothing could withdraw the awful cowardice of a moment's surrender.

An empty pot at the rainbow's end BLIND SPOTS

D H Lawrence has had countless passionate admirers - from F R Leavis and Lionel Trilling to hordes of angry, thwarted adolescents. But none has loved him half as much, says Thomas Sutcliffe, as Lawrence himself Imagine being trapped in a railway carriage

DIARY: Obituaries of the late Patricia Highsmith

Obituaries of the late Patricia Highsmith have stressed her unhappy childhood, her friendships with Graham Greene and Paul Bowles, her sphinx-like inscrutability and so forth. But not enough attention, I feel, has been paid to her relationship wi th snails.

Auden: How school taught me about fascism

A battered notebook with the poet's reflections on public school is to be sold. Marianne Macdonald reports

Graham Greene archive sold to American college

UK cannot meet £1m price, Marianne Macdonald reports

Obituary: Elaine Greene

laine Ruth Herbert, literary agent: born New York City 27 November 1920; married 1944 Robert Shaplen (died 1988; marriage dissolved), 1951 Hugh Greene (KCMG 1964, died 1987; two sons; marriage dissolved 1969); died London 10 January 1995.

Dash it all Jeeves, you've failed the test Could P G Wodehouse have written better with a grammar checker? David Bowen doe sn't think so

The late Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse was a master of the English language. Luckily he did not have Grammatik 5, or he could have been a very confused master.

Right of Reply : Michael Shelden defends his biography of Graham Greene, The Man Within

Published last month, Michael Shelden's biography of Graham Greene, The Man Within, was immediately pilloried for taking a prurient interest in the author's sex life, for its lack of research and overt animosity to its subject. 'The sheer hostility of his biography makes one wonder whether he has told the whole story' (Observer). 'Why he should have whipped himself up to such a fury of indignation in this book is a puzzle' (Irish Times). 'He is a locker-room snoop, digging and hustling for sleaze.' (Independent). 'Unfair', claims the American biographer . . .
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Indiana serial killer? Man arrested for murdering teenage prostitute confesses to six other murders - and police fear there could be many more

A new American serial killer?

Police fear man arrested for murder of teen prostitute could be responsible for killing spree dating back 20 years
Sweetie, the fake 10-year-old girl designed to catch online predators, claims her first scalp

Sting to trap paedophiles may not carry weight in UK courts

Computer image of ‘Sweetie’ represented entrapment, experts say
Fukushima nuclear crisis: Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on - and may never return home

Return to Fukushima – a land they will never call home again

Evacuees still stuck in cramped emergency housing three years on from nuclear disaster
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize

Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Intimate image of resting lions claims top prize
Online petitions: Sign here to change the world

Want to change the world? Just sign here

The proliferation of online petitions allows us to register our protests at the touch of a button. But do they change anything?
Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals

'You need me, I don’t need you'

Ed Sheeran hits back after being labelled too boring to headline festivals
How to Get Away with Murder: Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama

How to Get Away with Murder

Shonda Rhimes reinvents the legal drama
A cup of tea is every worker's right

Hard to swallow

Three hospitals in Leicester have banned their staff from drinking tea and coffee in public areas. Christopher Hirst explains why he thinks that a cuppa is every worker's right
Which animals are nearly extinct?

Which animals are nearly extinct?

Conservationists in Kenya are in mourning after the death of a white northern rhino, which has left the species with a single male. These are the other species on the brink
12 best children's shoes

Perfect for leaf-kicking: 12 best children's shoes

Find footwear perfect to keep kids' feet protected this autumn
Anderlecht vs Arsenal: Gunners' ray of light Aaron Ramsey shines again

Arsenal’s ray of light ready to shine again

Aaron Ramsey’s injury record has prompted a club investigation. For now, the midfielder is just happy to be fit to face Anderlecht in the Champions League
Comment: David Moyes' show of sensitivity thrown back in his face by former Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson

Moyes’ show of sensitivity thrown back in his face... by Ferguson

Manchester United legend tramples on successor who resisted criticising his inheritance
Two super-sized ships have cruised into British waters, but how big can these behemoths get?

Super-sized ships: How big can they get?

Two of the largest vessels in the world cruised into UK waters last week
British doctors on brink of 'cure' for paralysis with spinal cord treatment

British doctors on brink of cure for paralysis

Sufferers can now be offered the possibility of cure thanks to a revolutionary implant of regenerative cells
Ranked seventh in world’s best tourist cities - not London, or Edinburgh, but Salisbury

Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2015

UK city beats Vienna, Paris and New York to be ranked seventh in world’s best tourist destinations - but it's not London