Arts and Entertainment Royal flush: a scene from 'Powder Room'

Nearly 50 years after John Osborne and Arnold Wesker gave the world the kitchen-sink drama, a new dramatic form has entered the fray: the bathroom-sink drama.

Forget rock'n'roll, the Myspace generation are having an acoustic boom

Stars such as KT Tunstall and Kate Nash are products of a burgeoning countrywide open-mic scene, says Simon Hardeman

Estelle: 'At last I can speak my mind'

She was hailed as the saviour of British soul, then vanished after a fall-out with her label. Now Estelle is back – with a new set of celebrity friends and some serious attitude...

Arctic Monkeys ape Oasis with NME triumph

Gordon Brown and Andy Burnham both claim to listen to them on their iPods, but the Arctic Monkeys received a slightly hipper seal of approval last night when they were called the "Oasis of their generation" by the New Musical Express.

Kate Nash, Astoria, London

Young fans' support boosts success of internet sensation

Elisa Bray: Brits deliver the goods

So is pop back for good? Not just yet. Amidst competition from Take That and Girls Aloud, it was indie band Arctic Monkeys who took the awards for Best British Group and Best British Album for Favourite Worst Nightmare – the first artist to win two years running.

David Hepworth: These silly awards are pop's most absurd anachronism

The annual Brit Awards, which will dominate ITV 1 tonight and, if things go according to plan, the front pages tomorrow, started out in the mid-1970s as a business initiative aimed at selling British music to Johnny Foreigner. Taken strictly on those terms, it's never really worked. The odd Amy Winehouse and Boy George apart, British pop music has never been less attractive to the export market than during the Brits era, and there's something about the ceremony that distills the reasons why.

A star is born: But is Adele worth all the hype?

Her debut album has shot to No 1, critics can't get enough of her, and like all the best pop stars she only goes by her first name. But has 19-year-old Adele got what it takes to stayat the top? Elisa Bray charts the rise of Croydon's latest soul sensation

Adele, UCL Bloomsbury Theatre, London

There seems little reason to complete this review, since this much is already written: Adele will be huge in 2008. By the end of the week, her debut album 19 will be number one. By the end of next month, it will have been downloaded by tens of thousands of teens, and by the end of the year their parents will have caught on, too.

Sarah Sands: Realism, not romance, keeps you in a marriage

Like Russia, marriage is a riddle wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. It can be the source of the greatest human happiness and the cause of its greatest woes. My position on the institution is one of the purest moral hypocrisy. I believe in the sanctity of marriage and its social virtue. I am also happily divorced and remarried.

Sam Duckworth: The caped crusader who wants his songs to change the world

The Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly star tells Elisa Bray why he's not being naive

Sophie Heawood: Lily, I love the music, but you are no feminist

Last year, a friend of mine received Lily Allen's album as a birthday present from her dad. This father hadn't been around much in his daughter's life, but he'd heard that Alright, Still was the sort of CD that a girl might like for her 21st birthday.

Scare over Pill linked to rise in abortions

Alarming new evidence has emerged of a huge increase in unwanted pregnancies following last October's scare over the safety of the contraceptive Pill.

With a little help, they can manage

Roger Trapp reports on a management training scheme for disabled people
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
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Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
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Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project