News King Tutankhamun was buried with an upright penis in order to portray him as Osiris, the ancient Egyptian god of the afterlife, new research suggests

The ancient Egyptian pharaoh was buried with an erect penis, no heart and covered in black oils to make him appear as the god Osiris, new study claims

Last Night's TV: The Artful Codgers Channel 4<br />Flipping Out: Israel's Drug Generation, BBC4

From the inaccurately punning title on, The Artful Codgers played the story of the Greenhalgh family of Bolton for laughs: tee-hee, look at the uneducated working-class types putting one over on the snooty, silly art market. But by the end, the story was starting to look a lot less funny than the programme wanted to let on.

Philip Hensher: The answer lies in the length of men's shorts

The early outbreak of summer made me crack open the hot-weather wardrobe. In the way of these things, it turned out to contain, like Tutankhamun's tomb, treasures dating back practically to the dawn of time, favourite old T-shirts, ancient cracking pairs of sandals, and, especially, a long run of pairs of shorts. Some were 10 years old; others were from just last year.

Christina Patterson: The price of freedom is the right to sneer

A few months ago, at a dinner, I sat opposite a snail. Well, actually, it was a male human being, but I'll always think of him as a snail. And so, I imagine, will everyone else. For this was Lord Baker of Dorking, former chairman of the Conservative party, historian, editor of poetry anthologies and member of the House of Lords. Most famous, however, thanks to a latex puppet which disappeared from our television screens 15 years ago, for being a snail.

A nation of art lovers, not shopkeepers: Britain leads the world in survey of galleries

Britain leads the world in its love of art and culture, according to the latest statistics on galleries and museums. An authoritative survey of visitors to the world's leading art attractions shows that seven British galleries in the top 30 most visited pulled in more than 22.5 million people in 2007, beating France's 16.9 million and 17.7 million in the US.

The long and short of it: Marfan syndrome

Lucy Hunter's tall frame is due to a genetic disorder. Yet she refused screening for her sons, who both now have the condition. She explains why she has no regrets

Stepping off the tourist trail in Cairo and Luxor

Gill Harvey steers off the beaten track to sample ancient history and village life in a country where package tourists are increasingly isolated from ordinary citizens

The Nile: even Cleopatra wasn't pampered like this

The Nile cruise is one of the world's travel highlights. But Oberoi's new boat offers a very different take on this classic tour, says Katy Guest

Take your partners for the latest slimming aid: the foxtrot

Leading doctors said yesterday that ballroom dancing could offer a treatment for Britain's growing number of obese people. Ballroom dancing, they claim, is not only good entertainment, as last night's television final of Strictly Come Dancing proved: it is one of the best forms of cerebral and aerobic exercise.

Sean O'Grady: Tales of the City

The Tutankhamun ties, caps, bears and chocs I could take or leave on my journey to the afterlife

Miles Kington: Why I regret missing the World Toilet Summit

Is there a Tutankhamun's Loo beneath Cambridge Circus, waiting for future explorers?

Dome to host UK return of Tutankhamun

A boy king who died more than 3,000 years ago has emerged as the latest unlikely saviour of the troubled Millennium Dome.

King Tut returns, but at a price too high for the New York Met

King Tut is coming back to America. But this time he will cost - so much indeed that the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, doyen of US museums which hosted the first Treasures of Tutankhamun show in 1978, is having nothing to do with the follow-up.

Nick Townsend: Thanks a thousand to a shining knight

Landmark of a legend: Behind the desire and durability is now a vulnerability as Ferguson approaches magic mark

King Tut's CAT scan to solve murder mystery

It is one of the most puzzling whodunnits ever. Three thousand years after he died while King of Egypt, Tutankhamen's remains are to be X-rayed in an attempt to discover what - or who- killed him.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us