Student

As the possibility of unemployment looms for many, more than 500,000 each year choose to pursue further study in the form of a postgraduate taught programme such as a master's. The motivation behind this decision is often related to belief that a higher-level qualification will result in a better job. But does the CV addition of an MA, MBA or MSc actually improve employment prospects?

Mrs Klein, Almeida Theatre, London

Lukewarm in the final analysis

Dr Arthur Williams: Psychiatrist and psychoanalyst noted for his work with offenders

Arthur Williams was a noted psychiatrist and psychoanalyst whose pioneering work with offenders, including murderers, influenced generations of forensic clinicians.

The Hacker: Author tries level best to break par but the real star is birdie at home

Although our detractors don't believe it, most hackers go through a torment of attempts to improve their game. It's a long, hard struggle that yields encouragement to very few.

Lives Remembered: Betty Scharf

Betty Scharf died peacefully at her home on 25 April, aged 92. She was born on 1 January 1917 as Betty Hinchliff, her all-round abilities revealing themselves early on as she obtained a scholarship to Henrietta Barnett School and shone academically and at sports. A student at LSE in the years leading up to the Second World War, she was already an internationalist, prominent in the League of Nations Society and the Students' Union, leading a delegation to Czechoslovakia in 1937 and taking an active interest in Spain. Her first class B.Econ degree attracted the attention of the psychoanalyst John Bowlby, and she joined him in research for "44 Juvenile Thieves". During the war she lectured in Sociology under Professor Morris Ginsberg at LSE. In 1944 she married Rafael Scharf, a Polish Jew working as a War Crimes Investigator. The marriage lasted until his death in 2003.

Psychotherapists in turmoil over plans to start regulation

Government aim to protect clients from abuse will 'stifle creativity', say opponents

Observations: Time to get to the pointe

This Sunday, The Royal Ballet's Tamara Rojo will look at dance from a new perspective, discussing her work with psychoanalyst Luis Rodríguez de la Sierra at London Metropolitan University. The event is part of "Connecting Conversations", a series of talks bringing together psychoanalysis and other fields. They will compare choreography with psychoanalysis, while looking at psychological themes in ballet.

Hanif Kureishi on the couch

Race, family and sexuality are the big themes of Hanif Kureishi's era-defining fiction – but he also stands accused of misogyny and exploitation. Unapologetic, he tells Johann Hari about psychoanalysis, fundamentalism, and losing his virginity

A Quiet Adjustment, By Benjamin Markovits

The second in Benjamin Markovits's trilogy on the life of Lord Byron concerns a scandal that rocked the poet's reputation early on in his career. Arabella Milbanke, 19, is introduced to Bryon. Attracted to the feted author, she agrees to his proposal of marriage, suspecting his libertine ways will force her "to draw new breath".

Bodies, By Susie Orbach

It's been almost 30 years since Susie Orbach, as a young psychotherapist, picked up on the problems with eating and body image she was encountering in her work, and declared to the world that Fat is a Feminist Issue. Her argument was that "tucked into notions of thinness and fatness, were complex social and psychological ideas and feelings that were having difficulty being expressed directly".

Darkness Rising, By Frank Tallis

A Freudian PI returns in this historical thriller

The New Black: Mourning, melancholia and depression, By Darian Leader

By returning to outmoded expressions such as "melancholia", and challenging the kind of five-step recovery programmes for dealing with loss favoured by popular psychologists such as Elizabeth Kubler Ross, Darian Leader hopes to re-route society's current vogue for chemically dominated responses to what is seen overall as "depression" into something more specific and more psychoanalytically based.

Something to Tell You, By Hanif Kureishi

A teeming novel that draws on all the author's talent for comic discovery, Something to Tell You describes the trajectory of Jamal Khan as he matures from a left-wing wannabe into a middle-aged flaneur, a psychoanalyst for whom "secrets are my currency".

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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – Five-star MS Swiss Corona 7 nights from £999pp
Lake Como St Moritz & the Bernina Express 7 nights from £809pp
Vietnam
Lake Maggiore, Orta & the Matterhorn 7 nights from £939pp
South Africa
Spain
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Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all
The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

The week Hollywood got scared and had to grow up a bit

Sony suffered a chorus of disapproval after it withdrew 'The Interview', but it's not too late for it to take a stand, says Joan Smith
From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?

Panto dames: before and after

From Widow Twankey to Mother Goose, how do the men who play panto dames get themselves ready for the performance of a lifetime?
Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Thirties murder mystery novel is surprise runaway Christmas hit

Booksellers say readers are turning away from dark modern thrillers and back to the golden age of crime writing
Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best,' says founder of JustGiving

Anne-Marie Huby: 'Charities deserve the best'

Ten million of us have used the JustGiving website to donate to good causes. Its co-founder says that being dynamic is as important as being kind
The botanist who hunts for giant trees at Kew Gardens

The man who hunts giants

A Kew Gardens botanist has found 25 new large tree species - and he's sure there are more out there