Arts and Entertainment Katherine Jenkins performs at Epsom in June 2012

Cultural Life: The singer on her favourite music, film, tv and theatre picks

Chris Elliott: 'An engineer would ask, what are mps expenses for – and what would a solution look like?'

Chief executive officer of the Fitness Industry Association

Page Turner: In memory of Michael, the Puck of poetry

It's five whole years since the poet Michael Donaghy died, and the Purcell Room at the South Bank celebrated him on St Pat's with a concert of Irish music (Mike was as accomplished a musician as he was a poet) and a debate on his work. This all tied in with publication of his Collected Poems and The Shape of the Dance, a compilation of his critical prose (both Picador £12.99). The event began with a clip of the ebullient poet being interviewed. The chair, The Independent's Christina Patterson, observed that it didn't really give a flavour of Donaghy's personal presence, his sparkling erudition, enthusiasm and charisma. But it poignantly resurrected him, even in shadow form. "Hi Mike," you wanted to say, "where've you been?"

Is Harry Blain Britart's most powerful man?

Once upon time there was a great institution, tucked in just behind London's Royal Academy, called The Museum of Mankind. For 30 years it showed off the British Museum's extensive collective of ethnographical objects. About 10 years ago it closed its doors, and the building's been looking pretty woebegone ever since then, used for just a few days once a year to house the Zoo Art Fair. Otherwise, it has been empty and in serious need of refurbishment. Now a man called Harry Blain has brought it to life by leasing it from the Royal Academy and turning it into a private gallery. Except that it doesn't look and feel like a private gallery. It has all the panache of a museum space.

Lives Remembered: Richard Sell

Richard Sell, who died on 8 November 2008, had an advantage over me, his strict contemporary, in that he received a measure of art training before his enlistment in the army in 1942. He was therefore equipped to chart his way with detachment through his time in the Royal Indian Army Service Corps with a sketchbook and watercolours, the results of which were seen in a hastily arranged retrospective exhibition in Ely after he had been diagnosed with leukaemia.

Great Works: Icon of the Heavenly Ladder of St John Klimakos

Late 12th century, anonymous, Holy Monastery of St Catherine, Sinai

Tom Sutcliffe: This holy child needs a crib sheet

The Week In Culture

Byzantium 330-1453, Royal Academy, London

The Royal Academy is showing a stunning array of Byzantine icons - but do they enlighten, or merely dazzle?

Armstrong to quit Robin Hood

Jonas Armstrong, the actor who plays Robin Hood in the BBC remake of the tale, is to quit the show at the end of the third series.

Banned TS Eliot portrait goes on show

A portrait of the poet T S Eliot rejected by the Royal Academy in 1938 because it featured phallic references will be displayed at the National Portrait Gallery in a new exhibition.

Preview: Embodied Energy, various venues, London

The house that these dancers built

Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy, London

Who but a lunatic would agree to curate the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition, a show that this year includes no fewer than 1,129 works of painting, sculpture and much else? How does anybody make sense of it? Fortunately, there are serving academicians who are happy to oblige.

Album: Tom Richards Orchestra, Smoke and Mirrors (Candid)

The big bands might not be coming back but the form won’t go away. This incredibly assured debut from composer/arranger/saxophonist Richards and a 20-piece aggregation of young, often Royal Academy-trained players with Gwilym Simcock on piano, adopts a Maria Schneider or Vince Mendoza method with more sighs and whispers than rasps and growls. It’s at its best on the opening track "Dropping Pennies", with a show-stopping duo for Simcock and vibes-man Jim Hart heard between ticking rhythms and subtle reeds and brass harmonies. This is truly thrilling stuff.

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