Arts and Entertainment Katherine Jenkins performs at Epsom in June 2012

Cultural Life: The singer on her favourite music, film, tv and theatre picks

Visual Arts: Pick of the Week

Royal Academy Summer Exhibition

Royal Academy gives key role to media chief for key role

The former chief executive of Independent Television News (ITN) and the Economist Group, David Gordon, is to replace Piers Rodgers as secretary of the Royal Academy.

Iain Gale on exhibitions

Once again, this weekend the Royal Academy plays host to the London Original Print Fair. In the eleventh year of its existence, the fair continues to justify its reputation as being more than the usual dealer's bazaar that so often characterises such events. It may be a commercial enterprise, but underneath this is very much a serious and scholarly affair. Since its inception in 1985, the fair has become a key event for print collectors, as it has for the curators of the world's most important public galleries. The level of scholarship it now attracts is clearly reflected in the erudition with which exhibitors put together their displays.

Learned societies fight to keep historic homes

REBECCA FOWLER

Fraud inquiry after arrest of Royal Academy official

REBECCA FOWLER

Bestsellers: Top 10 at the Holding Company

Spring is nearly here, and if you don't feel like actual spring- cleaning, you can at least tidy up with the help of the Holding Company's fun storage ideas. At 243 King's Road, London SW3, or mail-order on 0171- 610 9160

Sibelius scores with the keyboard composers

Ben and Jonathan Finn were only looking for a shortcut to a music O-level exercise when they set out on the route to becoming millionaires. Their task was to take a melody line and write a harmony for it in the style of JS Bach. They decided to write a computer program to do the task. These attempts, and other computerised musical experiments, were to sow the seeds of a highly profitable software package.

BOOKS: THE DOORS OF PERCEPTION

An extract from the brilliant new biography of poet, artist and visionary William Blake

Win 5 original paintings, plus free exhibition posters

Summer Exhibition

VISUAL ARTS : Choice

Metamorphosis was Poussin's great theme: change for the better or worse, but always change. Poussin confronts change like a man still so moved by it, so deeply affected by its inevitability, that he can hardly bear to face it.

THE critical list

Courtney Pine (below) continues to redefine New British Jazz. His bewitching sax playing, blended with his acoustic quartet, can be heard at Glasgow City Hall on Thursday and at the Queen's Hall in Edinburgh on Friday.

ART / Choice

Painting, in its infinite variety, provides the theme for the first of the year's important exhibitions. In London, the Royal Academy hosts only the second chance ever to view the major paintings of Nicolas Poussin in one place (see feature, above). Further fascination for the power of paint is evident in the work of Sigmar Polke, whose relentless questioning of the nature of painting can at last be experienced by a British audience at the Tate Liverpool. This retrospective presents a range of work, from his neo-Pop paintings of the 1960s to his recent experiments with toxic substances and transparent "canvases".

ART / Musing on Poussin

The artist Bridget Riley on the case of the missing Poussin

Royal Academy tries the art of explanation

`Their simplicity may surprise regular visitors'
Career Services

Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home
Lauded therapist Harley Mille still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Lauded therapist still in limbo as battle to stay in Britain drags on

Australian Harley Miller is as frustrated by court delays as she is with the idiosyncrasies of immigration law
Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world. But could his predictions of war do the same?

Lewis Fry Richardson's weather forecasts changed the world...

But could his predictions of war do the same?
Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs: 'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

'I want to have contact with the audience, not iPhones'

Kate Bush asks fans not to take photos at her London gigs
Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities, but why?

Young at hort

Under-35s have rated gardening in their top five favourite leisure activities. But why are so many people are swapping sweaty clubs for leafy shrubs?