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Youth Culture

Music and drugs - It's a hard habit to break

Amy Winehouse's popularity came in part, says Andy Gill, from the honesty with which she sang of her addictions. But pop hasn't always faced up to the dangerous reality of drugs

A user's guide to age: We can't truly become 'amortal'

In an age of teenage millionaires and 60-year-old new mothers, it's tempting to think anyone can do anything - any time. But no matter how good the plastic surgery, we can't truly become 'amortal', argues Peter York

Pages of innocence: Devotees are creating an online archive of the

All over Britain, there are attics cluttered with them: crateloads of studiously compiled pop-culture magazines from yesteryear, now yellowing and dusty, that mums and dads are under strict instructions never to throw out. Men and women (though it's almost always men) of a certain generation can have a strange relationship with the magazines of their youth. Whether it's a stack of Smash Hits from the Eighties or every copy of The Face from the early Nineties, we may rarely go back to read them but we just need to know they are there should we ever need an emergency portal back to the good times they helped to narrate.

Natalie Merchant, Brighton Dome

It's not often that a gig is set in motion by the click of a slide projector but then we have come to expect something more from Natalie Merchant, the 46-year-old singer-songwriter who has long left behind the folk-pop proselytising of her 10,000 Maniacs days and settled into her role as a solo artist of rare maturity and depth.

More headlines

A briefs history of time

The changing shape of our bras and knickers over the past 100 years offers intimate insight into women's lives. Harriet Walker delves into the nation's drawers