Arts and Entertainment Catherine Tate and David Walliams bond in Big School

A dated and mild-mannered sitcom is saved by  its casting, but a social experiment goes phut

Media: A kiss goodbye to radical radio

It was the dance station that promised always to play innovative music. But now Kiss FM's owner, Emap, has discovered that a mainstream music policy makes better business sense. So is it the beginning of the end for independent radio? By Paul McCann

BOOKS: The Minotaur lurking in the shadows of Sixties London

The Long Firm by Jake Arnott Sceptre pounds 10

What's Up Doc?

Dr Martens are 40 this year - is that why the only person you know who wears them is your dad? OLIVER SWANTON sticks the boot in

Essay: I know which films you won't be seeing this summer ...

... Because Hollywood has now decided that it's had enough of screen violence.

The Joys of Modern Life 48. The Baseball Cap

THERE CAN be few sartorial signifiers that carry a more embarrassing message than the baseball cap. It's strange to remember that this unflattering headgear was once only recognisable to readers of Peanuts cartoons.

A sari doesn't make us fair game

I AM sure people were giving me looks of pity on the Tube last Friday. I was wearing a sari. I was a visible Asian woman, born to be beaten, raped, killed by close members of her family. This, after all, was the week when we heard how Ruksana Naz was murdered by her mother and brother for getting pregnant through an affair with a childhood sweetheart.

Tennis: Experience proves worth

YOUTH CULTURE may be all the rage in women's tennis but the French Open quarter-finals today will have a strikingly mature look.

The Information On: The Rambert Dance Company

What Is It?

Peter York on Ads No 273: Canderel: They rob the Fifties in such sweet style

Advertisers have robbed the Fifties blind. The low Fifties, that is: primeval youth culture; the golden years of rock and roll; every kind of kitsch Americana and every kind of old newsreel from Mr Cholmondley- Warner's cod Public Education films to Deep South front porch life. But they haven't, until now, really tapped the Golden Age High Fifties, the world of American photographers and movie-makers who took the best of everything for their settings in the search for elegance. I'm thinking Richard Avedon, Suzi Parker, Babe Paley, Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's. And I'm thinking about the advertising that evoked that world for American glossy magazines. Those models, impossibly tall, hatted, gloved and pearled who presented new miracle fibres from Du Pont and new appliances from Westinghouse by twisting themselves into weird attenuated positions, one leg behind the other, one long-gloved arm outstretched in amazement like very posh magicians' assistants.

Leading article: Grind on in our war against drugs

THERE IS a voyeuristic horror in watching the self-destruction of a minority of young people in ordinary British towns, but it is a fascination at a distance, informed by a feeling that heroin is nothing to do with us. We hope that in our series this week we have captured accurately and vividly some of the destructive power of the new wave of cheap heroin which is worrying the police and drugs agencies. But we also hope that we have shown how this is a problem which ought to worry the rest of us.

Leading Article: No one should feel complacent about the Littleton horror

THERE IS always a tendency for the British to react to horrors such as Littleton, Colorado with an air of "it could only happen in America". The instinctive response is to think that, with so many guns in the United States, it is not a matter of if, but when, the next high school will be attacked by resentful teenagers.

The Books Interview: Robert Irwin - No sympathy for the devil

Robert Irwin - cult novelist, Arabic scholar, ex-wizard and ace Roller-blader - meets Jane Jakeman

Punk: Out of Bondage

Whatever happened to all those punks who scared the tabloids and upset the Queen with their safety-pin fashions and calls to anarchy? As a new book is published celebrating this unique moment in British culture, Jonathan Dyson tracks down those who made it all happen. Original photographs by Ray Stevenson. Portraits by Florian Jaenicke

Arts: Why Irish culture leads by a head

In just a few decades Ireland, once almost a byword for parochialism, has become a world-beating brand name in contemporary music, film, theatre, comedy and literature. How did this happen?

Music: Remix your television set

First there was the Portastudio. Then there was the home sampler. Now, there's VJamm, a box of tricks that allows you to mess with both sound and vision in your own bedsit...
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003