Youth Culture

A Clockwork Orange, Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

Alexandra Spencer-Jones’ adaptation of Anthony Burgess’ classic novel won rave reviews last year when it debuted at the Fringe. A year on, it seems even more relevant as a commentary on the “disaffected youth” of last summer’s riots.

Music and drugs - It's a hard habit to break

Amy Winehouse's popularity came in part, says Andy Gill, from the honesty with which she sang of her addictions. But pop hasn't always faced up to the dangerous reality of drugs

The family blockbuster returns

JJ Abrams's Super 8 is inspired by the rites-of-passage movies he loved as he grew up. Kaleem Aftab celebrates a golden age

Pages of innocence: Devotees are creating an online archive of the

All over Britain, there are attics cluttered with them: crateloads of studiously compiled pop-culture magazines from yesteryear, now yellowing and dusty, that mums and dads are under strict instructions never to throw out. Men and women (though it's almost always men) of a certain generation can have a strange relationship with the magazines of their youth. Whether it's a stack of Smash Hits from the Eighties or every copy of The Face from the early Nineties, we may rarely go back to read them but we just need to know they are there should we ever need an emergency portal back to the good times they helped to narrate.

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'We just want Lucy to talk to us'

Jonathan Brown's three-year-old daughter is bright and happy – but struggling to speak. Just how worried should her parents be? He describes their search for answers