Prince Harry opens up about struggles of working from home with two-year-old son Archie

‘Archie spends more time interrupting our Zoom calls than anybody else’

Prince Harry has revealed some of the struggles he’s faced while working from home, detailing how his two-year-old son Archie, who he shares with wife Meghan Markle, frequently interrupts his Zoom calls.

The Duke of Sussex opened up about his everyday life during an interview with Today’s Hoda Kotb from The Hague, Netherlands, where Harry is currently attending the fifth Invictus Games.

To Prince Harry, Kotb said that she feels like “life happens on a random Wednesday,” as a majority of life “doesn’t have the highs and doesn’t have the lows”. With that in mind, she asked him what a “Wednesday” was like for the royal.

According to The Duke, his “Wednesdays” are dedicated to his son Archie and 10-month-old daughter Lilibet, especially as he’s been working from home. However, he said that working from home with his children can be a challenge.

“It really revolves around the kids, as much as humanly possible,” he explained. “This whole working from home stuff is not all it’s cracked up to be, post-Covid.”

He detailed how it’s hard being “the same place” with his children while working, as Archie often “interrupts” his Zoom calls more often “than anybody else”.

“It’s really hard when your kids and you are in the same place,” he continued. “It’s really hard to separate the work from them. Because they kind of overlap. I mean, Archie spends more time interrupting our Zoom calls than anybody else.”

However, Prince Harry still acknowledged that when Archie does interrupt his calls, it is still often a “nice thing”.

Kotb asked the Duke if Archie had the same “cheeky” personality that his father does. In response, Prince Harry said: “Yeah, and I think so. I always try and keep that. I think that, the cheekiness is something that keeps you alive.”

He then acknowledged how while there’s always so many things in the world to be “happy” about, there is stil “so much to worry about”. With that in mind, he said that one of his responsibilities as a “parent” is to try and “make the world a better place” for the sake of his children.

“My sort of mantra now every day, it’s a dangerous one, because I need to make sure that I don’t have burnout, but it’s trying to make the world a better place for my kids,” he explained. “Otherwise, what’s the point in bringing kids into this world, right? It’s a responsibility that I feel as a parent and that you probably feel as a parent as well.”

“We can’t fix everything,” he added. “We know that, but what we can do is be there for each other.”

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