Shane Warne’s greatest moments: From ‘Ball of the Century’ to World Cup glory

The legendary Australian spin bowler has died aged 52 following a suspected heart attack

Shayne Warne’s most memorable moments

Australian cricket legend Shane Warne has died aged 52 following a suspected heart attack.

The spinner took 708 Test wickets and 293 one-day dismissals during an illustrious 15-year international career.

A statement released by Warne’s management team on Friday read: “It is with great sadness we advise that Shane Keith Warne passed away of a suspected heart attack in Koh Samui, Thailand today, Friday 4 March.”

“The family requests privacy at this time and will provide further details in due course.”

Here, we look back at some of Warne’s most memorable moments.

Ball of the century

Shane Warne bowls 'Ball of the Century' against England at Old Trafford

A peroxide-haired Warne was 23 when he faced England for the first time in the 1993 Ashes and produced a moment of magic with his very first delivery at Old Trafford to dismiss Mike Gatting, which became fabled as the ‘ball of the century’. Warne pitched the ball outside leg stump, only for it to roar back past Gatting’s guard and send the bails flying before the former England captain trudged off with a look of sheer disbelief.

MCG hat-trick

The Boxing Day Test at Melbourne in the 1994/95 Ashes series saw Warne claim his only Test hat-trick against England. Having returned six for 64 in the first innings, he then sent Phil DeFreitas, Darren Gough and Devon Malcolm back to the pavilion in successive deliveries.

Top of the world

Shane Warne helped Australia win the 1999 Cricket World Cup

Australia won the 1999 World Cup in England, where Warne again took centre stage against Pakistan in the final at Lord’s. A spell of four for 33 in a blistering nine-over spell helped skittle Pakistan out for just 132. Warne was named man-of-the-match as Steve Waugh’s side coasted past their victory target at the home of cricket.

Gabba delight

Warne returned amazing match figures of 11 wickets for 110 runs as England were beaten in the opening Test of the 1994/95 series in Brisbane. Mike Atherton’s men had enjoyed an undefeated summer on home soil, but their confidence of regaining the urn was soon dismantled, with Warne taking eight for 71 during the second innings.

Ashes Swansong

Warne eventually ended his Ashes torment in England in 2005. Although by now 35 and the tourists eventually losing the series, the Victorian ended top of the bowling averages with a 40-wicket haul, while also scoring 249 runs – including hitting 90 in the third Test at Old Trafford. He rounded off his glorious Test career on home soil the following winter as Australia regained the urn with a 5-0 whitewash.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in