The 10 Best children's shoes

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As we step into summer, ensure your little ones are well shod with these hard-wearing, comfortable beauties

{1} Camper

These red Mary Janes with white polka dots and charming cupcakes are made from exceptionally soft leather and a thick rubber outsole. The result is a comfortable, long-lasting and very pretty pair of shoes, although be warned – they come up quite small.

£55, camper.com

{2} Mothercare

You can always count on Mothercare for excellent value. These super- comfortable canvas shoes have easy fastening, are slip-resistant and are made from soft material in a cheery print to suit a wide range of ages. And unlike many canvas kids’ shoes, they’re hard-wearing too.

£10, mothercare.com

{3} Chatham

Made from premium leather with sticky rubber soles for an extra good grip, these deck shoes are perfect for boys to run around in this summer. There’s a Velcro version if you don’t like the laces and they come in brown, black or navy.

£39, chatham-marine.co.uk

{4} Inch Blue

OK, so you don’t actually need shoes for newborns, but who can resist these soft leather shoes that come in a range of fabulous designs? Available from birth up to 18 months, they have supple non-slip suede soles that suit tiled and wooden floors, while the elasticised ankles ensure they stay on.

£18, babeswithbabies.com

{5} Clarks

These classic bar shoes are made from mushroom leather and decorated with pretty pastel flowers. They’re available in brown, white, grey or pink and, just as you’d expect from Clarks, you can get whole and half sizes with different width fittings.

£32, clarks.co.uk

{6} Step2wo

Boys’ shoes don’t get more adorable than these desert boots, designed in London and made in Italy. Available  in brown, navy, red, yellow or pink, they are beautifully made, extremely comfortable and super sturdy, if a  little pricey.

£58, step2wo.com

{7} Crocs

Since being first unveiled in 2002, Crocs have gone from strength to strength. While there are many replicas now available, a lot fo them won’t last very long. The originals remain the most durable and comfy for children and are a godsend in  the summertime.

£29.99, crocs.co.uk

{8} Boden

Girls’ sandals can be hit and miss when it comes to comfort and durability. But this retro pair, which are available in a wide variety of lovely colours, are a great fit, extremely well made and suited to everyday or party wear.

£24, boden.co.uk

{9} Next

You can spend a lot of money on trainers for youngsters, but you don’t need to. These are great quality for well under £20 and the dark colour will hide all the dirt that they’re bound to attract.

£16, next.co.uk

{10} Boden

These laceless pull-ons are easy enough for childrem to cope with, while being cool enough to suit older boys, too. No wonder Boden makes them available year after year and that customers can’t get enough of them.

£20, boden.co.uk

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