News King Tutankhamun was buried with an upright penis in order to portray him as Osiris, the ancient Egyptian god of the afterlife, new research suggests

The ancient Egyptian pharaoh was buried with an erect penis, no heart and covered in black oils to make him appear as the god Osiris, new study claims

Secrets the ancient Egyptians had hoped to keep to themselves

David Aaronovitch unexpected uses for mummified dna

Britain: The Pharaoh of Dorchester

The treasures of Tutankhamun in Dorset? Yes, as good as, complete with animal-headed gods and realistic smells. Emma Haughton goes tomb raiding for a family visit

Mummies back from dead with a modern miracle

UPPER-CLASS Egyptians preparing for their journey for the afterlife cannot in their wildest dreams have imagined that it might take a tiny part of them to Manchester in the cause of medical science.

How We Met; Edward Enfield and Lorraine Chase

Writer and broadcaster Edward Enfield, 68, was educated at Westminster School and Oxford. He worked in the Far East and in local government until retirement, when he began writing; one of his four children, the comedian Harry Enfield, sent some of his work to Richard Ingrams, who immediately gave him a regular column in the 'Oldie' magazine. He now co-presents 'Watchdog' and 'Oldie TV', and lives with his wife in Sussex. The actress Lorraine Chase, 46, was born in Camberwell, south London, and worked as a model before being catapulted to fame by Campari's famous 'Luton airport' advert in the Seventies. Chase recently published her first book, 'Money and How to Make More of It', and lives alone in London

Arab world gripped by conspiracy theories on 'Islamic martyr Diana'

Did Diana die a Muslim? is the title of just one of six paperbacks selling on the streets of Cairo. Probably, is author Magdi Kamel's answer, and if the Princess of Wales hadn't already converted to Islam, she was intending to - a "fact" which sent a "shockwave of fear" through the Royal Family. As for her death, Mr Kamel says the British authorities decided "to ask the British secret police to find a final solution to the problem of Diana".

Death on the Nile: was King Tut's killer the general by the pyramid?

In what must be the longest running "whodunnit" of all time, new evidence has emerged into the mysterious death, 3,000 years ago, of King Tutankhamun.

Brit brains solve the riddle of the 'rang

Robin Stummer on the scientist putting the boom in boomerangs

History comes alive

Homework? It's fun for all the family.

Pseudo-cartoons are no laughing matter

The other day on Radio 4 the comedian Graham Norton was quoting from an old Punch cartoon which had tickled his fancy enough to stick in his mind. It was a drawing of a psychiatrist looking down at a patient on a couch and saying to him: "That's not much of an inferiority complex, is it?" It has stuck in my mind as well, not because it's quite funny but because it is a cartoon of a type that doesn't seem to be done much any more, the cartoon with witty dialogue, or with a witty twist on a situation. One of the very best examples of the latter was the JW Taylor cartoon showing a late 18th century publisher talking to a young lady novelist, saying: "We like the plot, Miss Austen, but all this effing and blinding will have to go."

How fir can you go?

Christmas trees are seriously fashionable, says Jane Furnival

How does your garlic grow?:gardening

Perhaps those baffling people who find garlic repulsive are really vampires and fiends. Since I've never hung around with the likes of Vincent Price, my appreciation of garlic has largely been confined to the kitchen, where I revere it is one of life's great gastronomic pleasures. It also endears itself to the gardener in me, by being a complete doddle to grow.

Obituaries: Eiddon Edwards

Eiddon Edwards was the first Keeper of Egyptian Antiquities at the British Museum from 1955 to 1974. The crowning glory of his keepership was the organisation of the large Tutankhamun exhibition in 1972 for which he personally selected objects to be loaned from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Books: The Mrs Thatcher of ancient Egypt

Sue Gaisford is enthralled by an account of the ''foremost of women''

Mast sends wrong signal to Lloyd Webbers

The man who funded the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb is buried there. De Havilland flew his first aircraft from there. And for centuries, bonfires have been lit there at times of national celebration and tragedy.
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War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

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