Long Runners: No 19: Jackanory

Age: 28. Actor Lee Montague, parked uneasily on a wrought-iron garden bench, read the first story, Cap of Rushes, just before Christmas 1965.

Obituary: Kenneth Connor

Kenneth Connor, actor: born London 6 June 1916; MBE 1991; married (one son); died Harrow, Middlesex 28 November 1993.

FILM / Mr Kline goes to Washington

WOULD YOU take a bullet for the leader of the free world? That is what Secret Service men in Hollywood movies are asking themselves right now, as the fields of the republic grow darker and the White House loses its sheen. Clint Eastwood's agent Frank Horrigan gave the positive, patriotic response in In the Line of Fire, but, then, he was a relic of the Kennedy era, with a debt to pay off for the dimming of its one brief shining moment. The agent who is asked the question in Ivan Reitman's political comedy Dave (12), a glum black officer with more than the regulation-issue wariness, has to ponder it. He is asking not what he can do for his country, but whether his country is done for.

THE FRINGE / Not as funny as all that: Nick Curtis on the caperings of Penny Dreadful and the calm Song for a Bluefoot Man

DESPITE flashes of subtlety and a nominal plot, the Right Size's new show, Penny Dreadful (BAC, London), is the live theatrical equivalent of a Road Runner cartoon. The multilingual clowning theatre company specialises in brash physical comedy that is part mime, part slapstick and can just about be traced back to the traditions of the commedia dell'arte.

'Pink Panther gang' jailed for four years: Court told of 'beautifully executed' raid to steal Cartier gold and jewels

Members of a 'Pink Panther-style' jewellery gang were jailed for four years yesterday for planning a raid on a Cartier workshop in London.

Obituary: Victor Maddern (CORRECTED)

CORRECTION (PUBLISHED 25 JUNE 1993) INCORPORATED INTO THIS ARTICLE

TELEVISION / BRIEFING: Animated discussions

The animator Bob Godfrey does not work on Schwarzenegger- sized budgets; in fact, as one of his collaborators puts it, 'a shoestring would be a luxury.' Nevertheless, as Bob Godfrey - A Life in Shorts shows, he thrives on adversity, cheerfully cutting and pasting from the most unlikely sources (an Abyssinian fire-eater, The Third Man), and apparently furnishing his shambolic Soho office entirely from skips. This illuminating profile for FOUR- MATIONS: ASPECTS OF COMEDY (9pm C4) examines the playful mind behind not only the children's classics Roobarb and Henry's Cat, but also the first British cartoons to be awarded an X certificate. Godfrey has been responsible for some of the best of British comedy over the past three decades, working with the Goons and Terry Gilliam (the scene in Godfrey's Revolution where a piano lid is slammed on Beethoven's fingers is pure Python). And in 1974 he won an Oscar for Great (shown last Sunday). Godfrey's work is testament to the creativity that can spring from chaos. But it takes its toll; one of his editors suggests that many people who go to Godfrey's office might be better off visiting the neurological hospital next- door.

While there's life there's dope

OF ALL the great lies you're told in childhood, few are quite as whopping as 'Cheats never prosper'. Sport without cheating would be like a north London pavement without a scraped trail of dog excrement gleaming in the sunlight - utterly inconceivable. Only the most pathetic cheats, as far as I can see, never prosper. Poor old Ben Johnson has been nabbed once again, after officials noticed that he'd been behaving in suspicious manner - ie running quickly. Meanwhile, the Jockey Club have been caught trying desperately to hush up a doping scandal, after a couple of horses 'tested positive for a banned substance', as the jargon goes. Subsequent rumours, that the horses in question have since been espousing world peace and listening to Pink Floyd, have happily been discounted.

Profile: It's such a laugh being somebody else: Harry Enfield, Mr I-don't-think-I'm-funny-as-myself

Rod Stewart was re-united with the Faces; U2, the world's most popular group, turned up in force; and kd lang, the world's most wonderful singer, belted out a number. There was no disputing, however, who was the star turn at last month's Brit Awards, the rock business's annual junket of self-congratulation. And he wasn't even a pop singer.

The ideal cause for cerebration: Kevin Jackson sees in the new year by crashing some memorable parties on film and in print

TO BEGIN at the most elementary level: parties are a leisure activity - which is to say, they're a way for writers to gather a group of disparate characters together without having to do any hard work on dramatic structure. Just as every soap opera from Ambridge to Albert Square relies on its local pub as the forum where the dramatis personae can be assembled without any need for their motives to be spelled out, so the party scene can be the zero degree of screenwriting. Why are all my characters crammed together in this one room / house / garden? Because they wanted to be, silly - can't you see they're all at a party?

FILM / Preview: A selection of the highlights from the 36th London Film Festival

The 36th London Film Festival begins next Thursday with the gala premiere of Kenneth Branagh's Peter's Friends. The Festival box-office opens to the public tomorrow, but callers will find that Peter's Friends is already sold out. The explanation is that BFI members have been able to buy tickets for several weeks, and have snapped up all the tickets for some of the Festival highlights in advance. Some, but not all. Here we propose 10 worthwhile films for which there are still tickets remaining and which are showing in the evening or at weekends. Tickets, from pounds 5.95, can be purchased by credit card from the Festival box- office (071-928 3232) or in person from the NFT or the Film on the Square ticket office in Leicester Square (from 1 Nov).
News
Alan Bennett has criticised the “repellent” reality shows which dominate our screens
tvBut he does like Stewart Lee
Life and Style
The Google Doodle celebrating the start of the first day of autumn, 2014.
tech
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black and Ed Stoppard as her manager Brian Epstein
tvCilla Episode 2 review: Grit under the glamour in part two of biopic series starring Sheridan Smith
Sport
David Moyes and Louis van Gaal
football
News
i100
Life and Style
Vote with your wallet: the app can help shoppers feel more informed about items on sale
lifeNew app reveals political leanings of food companies
News
Former Governor of Alaska Sarah Palin, left, with her daughter, Bristol
newsShe's 'proud' of eldest daughter, who 'punched host in the face'
Sport
New Zealand fly-half Aaron Cruden pictured in The Zookeeper's Son on a late-night drinking session
rugby
Arts and Entertainment
Salmond told a Scottish television chat show in 2001that he would also sit in front of a mirror and say things like,
tvCelebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
Life and Style
Carol O'Brien, whose son Rob suffered many years of depression
healthOne mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Panama
Languedoc Roussillon
Marrakesh & the Atlas Mountains
Bruges
The Jura Mountains
Dubrovnik & the Dalmatian Coast
Prices correct as of 17 September 2014
Secret politics of the weekly shop

The politics of the weekly shop

New app reveals political leanings of food companies
Beam me up, Scottie!

Beam me up, Scottie!

Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

Beware Wet Paint

The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
Sanctuary for the suicidal

Sanctuary for the suicidal

One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

Not That Kind of Girl:

A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

Model mother

Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

Apple still the coolest brand

Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits