Arts and Entertainment

"Bo Burnham: What", Pleasance Grand, Edinburgh Fringe, August

Gilbert & George: 'There's nothing wrong with patriotism'

Their new show might be a celebration of Britishness. But then again it might not. John Walsh enters the endlessly contradictory world of Gilbert and George

Gilbert and George make bid for establishment status

The Britart duo Gilbert and George have built their reputations on producing some of the most outrageous and shocking artworks featuring nudity, images of sexual acts and using bodily fluids including urine and semen.

Forever Nude, By Guy Goffette

If you can overlook the dodgy title, this diverting novelette proves a nostalgia-filled introduction to the work of French artist, Pierre Bonnard. Related in brief, impressionistic chapters, Guy Goffette, a Belgian poet, re-imagines the life of a painter now best known for his dreamy depictions of women at their toilette.

Album: Zed-U, Night Time in the Middle Passage, (Babel)

There are any number of English bands with a heavy post-modern spin whose albums you'd never willingly listen to twice.

Abstract America, Saatchi Gallery, London

The styles and strategies of the past 20 years have foundered on lack of originality, as this exhibition illustrates

Antony Beevor: 'History has not emphasised enough the suffering of French civilians during the War'

Poor Doctor Stagg. How tightly the hand of history, for a short time, clasped his shoulder. In 1944, the Scot was Britain's leading civilian weather expert. Suddenly, he had been made a group captain in the RAF, so that he carried the necessary authority to dole out decisive advice on the timing of the invasion of Normandy.

Nicholas Maw: Composer whose modernism was underpinned by his lyricism and Romantic leanings

Nicholas Maw was a Romantic composer of a decidedly modern sort, one who found that there still existed, within long continuity, possibilities of extraordinary range and freshness.

Philip Glass: 'I think I'm built for this kind of life. I train like an athlete'

The world's most austere composer drove taxis until he was 42. He reveals how his fastidious life informs his music

Grave new world: There's a sombre new mood in the arts world

The 'South Bank Show' with Melvyn Bragg may be ending, but across the arts there is suddenly a hunger for serious fare, says David Lister

Così Fan Tutte, Theatre Royal, Glasgow

Latin lotharios steal the heart

Jack Cardiff: Oscar-winning cinematographer celebrated for his work with Powell and Pressburger

When I met Jack Cardiff on a film set at Elstree Studios, he was busy heaving spotlights around and nipping up a ladder to adjust them. The legendary cinematographer was then 84. Cardiff's career spanned the best part of film's first century; he worked with many of the art form's greatest practitioners and was famed for his pioneering mastery of Technicolor. But, whereas others might have been content to rest on their laurels, pottering around the occasional festival or sitting on the odd panel as emblems of nostalgia, he remained active and passionate about movies throughout his life. His last project was the television documentary mini-series The Other Side of the Screen (2007).

Matthew Norman: Public outrage counts for nothing

Fury at politicians is a noble emotion, and a moral imperative. But it won't change things

Pandora: Vince turns a blind eye to Obama circus

The peculiar paradox of Obama's credit-crunch-busting entourage appears lost on the upper echelons of the Liberal Democrats. Or, if not lost, then studiously ignored ( Pandora suspects the latter).

Album: Liam Noble, Brubeck (Basho)

Yes, postmodernism has made Dave Brubeck cool again, although he was always rather po-mo himself, pretentious and corny in equal parts. Pianist Noble's trio with Dave Whitford on bass and Dave Wickins on drums fairly rattles along, swinging madly on the opening "Give a Little Whistle" and getting suitably sentimental on two versions of "In Your Own Sweet Way", one of the great jazz standards. By the time they get to Paul Desmond's "Take Five", they're flying. A very effective tribute.

Album: Buddy & Julie Miller, Written in Chalk (New West)

Garlanded with praise from the likes of Emmylou Harris and Don Was ("This might be the best record I've ever heard"), Written in Chalk has the nobility of old-time country music, but with a post-modern appreciation of blues, jazz and the innovations of artists such as Tom Waits and Robert Plant.

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<p>
<b>Kathryn Williams</b>
</p>
<p>
When I was supporting Ray La Montagne I was six months pregnant. He had been touring for a year and he was exhausted and full of the cold. I was feeling motherly, so I would leave presents for him and his band: Tunnock's Tea Cakes, cold remedies and proper tea. Ray seemed painfully shy. He hardly spoke, hardly looked at you in the face. I felt like a dick speaking to him, but said "hi" every day. </p>
<p>
He was being courted by the same record company who had signed me and subsequently let me go, and I wanted him to know that there were people around who didn't want anything from him. At the Shepherds Bush Empire in London, on the last night of the tour, Ray stopped in his set to thank me for doing the support. He said I was a really good songwriter and people should buy my stuff. I was taken aback and felt emotionally overwhelmed. Later that year, just before I had my boy Louis, I was l asleep in bed with Radio 4 on when Louis moved around in my belly and woke me up. Ray was doing a session on the World Service. </p>
<p>
I really believe that Louis recognised the music from the tour, and when I gave birth to him at home I played Ray's record as something that he would recognise to come into the world with. </p>
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

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From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

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Songs from the bell jar

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How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

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The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

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End of the Aussie brain drain

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Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

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Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

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Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

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Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

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