Arts and Entertainment

"Bo Burnham: What", Pleasance Grand, Edinburgh Fringe, August

Naturally gifted: Richard Long at the Hepworth gallery

In The Studio: Richard Long, sculptor

'My work is my studio... my work is walking from place to place'

Leaving the Atocha Station, by Ben Lerner

Smart and funny, the mishaps of an expat poet in Madrid expose the artistic ego

Raw lasagne from 42°Raw

On The Menu: 42°Raw lasagne; Standard Hotel; The Mall Tavern; Greenhalgh's crumpet loaf

This week I've been eating... raw lasagne

The Word for Snow, Purcell Room, London

Programmes were not distributed until after the show, but you were handed a single sheet of white paper, blank except for one typed word – mine, somewhat dispiritingly, was "sock" – as you made your way into the Purcell Room for this European premiere of a short play by Don DeLillo.

Contemporary Georgian Fiction, Edited and translated by Elizabeth Heighway

I recently attended a presentation about non-Georgians' perceptions of Georgia. Essentially, we're talking copious drinking, banquets, war, hospitality and Stalin. It's probably a fair summation of what most in the UK know, or think they know, about the country. Now Dalkey Archive Press has attempted to widen our perspective, publishing an anthology of contemporary stories by 20 distinguished Georgian writers. Georgians are proud of their literature – but how many writers can you name?

Fiona Rae's 'We Go in Search of Our Dream'

Fiona Rae, Maybe You Can Live on the Moon in the Next Century, Leeds Art Gallery

Fiona Rae describes her love of painting thus: "You get to invent a world and you get to be in charge of what happens in that world. And you don't really get to do that in life, do you?" She smiles at the camera and continues to work on the lilac space around a pink Hallmark-esque heart, superimposed on the canvas. A lime-green thread appears, faintly, under her brush.

Philip Hensher: Pays no heed to the comfort of others

Artifact, Sadler’s Wells, London

William Forsythe’s Artifact is self-conscious and self-aware, a ballet about being a ballet. As dancers run through patterns or wind themselves into fractured duets, curtains descend with a thump or speakers try to pin down an act of memory. The Royal Ballet of Flanders could be tauter in Forsythe’s patterns, but push confidently through his games.

<i>Bridge (White Curve - Green and Yellow Bus)</i> by Tim Davies (2009-11)

Artists' Postcards: A Compendium, By Jeremy Cooper

Of interest to students of art and deltiologists (collectors of postcards) alike, Jeremy Cooper's extensively illustrated book provides the first critical study of the place of the humble postcard in the history of art.

Dvorak's dark side set to light up the stage

I'm all for cats at the opera – a fuzzy feline will always raise a smile. But isn't there something alarming about it when a mermaid meets one? We all know what cats do to fish. It looks as if that might happen to the unfortunate Rusalka, the eponymous heroine of Dvorak's post-Wagnerian take on The Little Mermaid, in the opera's first-ever production at the Royal Opera House.

The Afterparty, By Leo Benedictus

Not enough story to tell – how very postmodern

Capital gain: the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, recently reopened after a dazzling modernisation

The world's first portrait gallery gets a facelift

Edinburgh's 122-year-old institution has had a 21st-century renovation

Extravagance personified: Serra's 7 soars out of the Bay of Doha

The magnificent '7' adds an edge to Doha's gloss

Richard Serra reveals the inspiration behind his 80ft landmark to Jay Merrick

The White People and other Weird Stories, By Arthur Machen

Ghost stories are as much a part of Christmas as freezing fog and fortified wine. While not as well-known as masters of the genre such as MR James or Algernon Blackwood, Arthur Machen's remain among the most brilliant and disquieting tales of the supernatural.

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