Arts and Entertainment

"Bo Burnham: What", Pleasance Grand, Edinburgh Fringe, August

Telling Tales, By Melissa Katsoulis

Melissa Katsoulis's entertaining account of literary hoaxes from the ancient world to the present day covers all three main kinds of hoax: the "genuine" hoax, that is to say the hoax that was never intended to be discovered (the Hitler diaries, the Ossian poems); the mock hoax, where a writer adopts a persona to create a new literary voice, such as James Norman Hall's invention of the 10-year-old poet Fern Gravel; and, most deliciously of all, the entrapment hoax, perpetrated to make a fool of a specific target.

Tim Walker: 'I still love Entourage – the way you love an ageing pet who's blind and lame'

The Couch Surfer: Entourage could come gracefully to an official end and live on through cameos in other shows.

Simon Calder: Can't remember the Sixties? You can still go there

One virtue of the 1960s: the dreadful term "staycation" was a good four decades from being coined. At the time, mind, the majority of Brits had no option but to holiday at home. Even though the package-holiday industry was expanding rapidly, the government did its utmost to keep us at home with a limit on overseas spending of just £50. So the best way to travel vicariously was to visit exotic locations in Britain that distilled the essence of Abroad and served it up to the passer-by.

Handel Remixed, Barbican Hall, London<br/>The Bernstein Project, Royal Festival Hall, London<br/>The Damnation of Faust, Barbican Hall, London

Take five composers, think 'bland and commercial', cut and paste a few bars, and call it an anniversary tribute? How depressing

Album: Yoko Ono Plastic Ono Band, Between My Head and the Sky (Chimera Music)

Advancing age clearly poses less of a barrier to pop success than in previous eras, as the recent chart placings of Bob Dylan and the Beatles can confirm.

Mark Steel: So has anyone really been 'Islamified' against their will?

The most effective opposition comes when people refuse to be intimidated

Superb Ponting dashes England hopes

England 299 v Australia 302-6 (Australia won by four wickets)

Boyd Tonkin: Not so far away as the Booker goes Czech

The Week In Books

Ordinary Thunderstorms, By William Boyd

A man newly arrived in the big city makes a brief acquaintance with a preoccupied stranger. The next time they meet, there's a knife sticking out of the stranger's side. Our hero scarpers, leaving incriminating clues, but finds there's a ruthless assailant outside his home. Soon he's on the run, both from the police and some unknown malevolent organisation which is out to get him, unless he gets them first...

Album: Netsayi, Monkey's Wedding (World Connection)

Just as Mali's Rokia Traoré irritated some purists with her coolly innovative recent album Tchamantché, so Zimbabwe's Netsayi is set to ruffle a few ceremonial feathers with this thrilling mix of African polyrhythms and Joan Armatrading-style singer-songwriting.

The Bellini Madonna, By Elizabeth Lowry

Elizabeth Lowry's debut novel has one of the creepiest narrators since Nabokov's Humbert Humbert; this one, too, falls for a young girl, though one slightly older than Lolita. Thomas Lynch is an acquisitive art historian, who has already been sacked from his New England college for sexual misdemeanours, when he arrives at Mawle House in Oxford, on the hunt for a missing masterpiece he believes is concealed in its grounds. Young Anna is the owner of the house, and she and her mother are well aware of the reason Lynch has come to see them; whether they will let him get what he wants is another matter.

Album: Blitzen Trapper, Black River Killer (Sub Pop)

It's no surprise to learn that both Wilco and Fleet Foxes have chosen Blitzen Trapper as the support act for their late summer UK tours, as the Portland, Oregon-based sextet share many of those bands' musical traits.

Lutyens, 85 Fleet Street, London, EC4

Forgive me if I shed a tear, but a trip to Lutyens hurtles the ageing journalist down Memory Lane, to the days when one wrote stories on Adler portable typewriters that went ping!, and one hung out in El Vino's at lunchtime, chatting to someone from a rival newspaper about what the conclusion to your leader should be. Sir Terence Conran's new restaurant is imposingly housed in the old Reuters building designed by Sir Edward Lutyens in 1930, next door to the journalists' church of St Bride's. It's his third venture with Peter Prescott – they've already opened Boundary and the Albion Café in howlingly trendy Shoreditch – and, although this intersection of Fleet Street and Farringdon isn't a natural posing venue for the Pixie Geldof generation, you can be sure Conran knows what he's doing.

The Black Album: A work in progress

Hanif Kureishi's stage version of his novel The Black Album explores Muslim fundamentalism, youth culture and alienation. Kenan Malik sits in on rehearsals

Gilbert &amp; George: The Jack Freak Pictures, White Cube, London

Insofar as anything to do with Gilbert and George can be described as natural, their recent fondness for axes of reflection is it. An axis of reflection is a line – the surface of a pond, say – that divides an object from its mirror image. Since their Tate Modern show in 2007, G&G's work has been full of them.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project