Enrich yourself with a tour around Hong Kong’s vibrant art scene

From established galleries to emerging pop-ups and art fairs modern and traditional, head to Hong Kong to exhibition-hop, art-shop and enjoy a meal with a view…

You’d be hard pressed to find a more artistically exciting destination than Hong Kong. It’s been busy cementing itself as Asia’s undisputed nerve centre of culture, creativity and visual art for over a decade, and with the recent development of the West Kowloon Cultural District – and the celebrated new Palace Museum dedicated to Chinese art and culture – it appears those efforts have paid off.

Hong Kong Moments

Established institutions

Hong Kong art institutions like Para Site have drawn culture-seekers to the city in recent years

The city already attracts international artists, curators, buyers and art lovers to its fairs – Art Basel Hong Kong, the Asia Contemporary Art Show, Art Central and the Affordable Art Fair among many others.

Established institutions like Tai Kwun, PMQ, Para Site, the Hong Kong Museum of Art and Blindspot Gallery have long held pole positions on arty visitors’ priority lists. But a new generation of mixed media hubs and pop-up galleries are starting to throw their hats in the ring.

A fresh new scene

New creative hubs and galleries – like Aishonanzuka in Central – are popping up in Hong Kong’s creative locales

If you want to see the first exhibitions of the future stars of the art world, 13A New Street is the place to go. This venue was started by a group of young artists, designers, and creators with the aim of bolstering local and international artists through its exhibitions, lectures and workshops.

Aishonanzuka in Central is a collaboration between Aisho Miura Arts and Nanzuka galleries which aims to bring contemporary international art to the Hong Kong art scene by featuring established and emerging artists from Japan and overseas. One of its most recent installations, Kaleidoscope, is a group exhibition by three very different Japanese artists: Kazuki Umezawa, Keiji Izumi and Takeshi Masada. Expect to also encounter the long twisted characters of Hungarian painter Akos Ezer and the intricate waves and vibrant dots of Korean artist Yoon Hyup during your visit.

Aesthetic hotels and street art

Be sure to pay a visit to Hotel Stage - which functions as an arts space supporting local talent

Away from the galleries, even Hong Kong’s hotels are getting in on the action, with places like Hotel Stage near Jordan MTR station positioning itself as an arts platform supporting local talent and the community.

A short walk away, in Yau Ma Tei, Tung Nam Lou is an elegant hotel, working space and art shop. The hotel was once the site of the local seafood restaurant before it was converted into an office building and finally into the celebration of arts and local culture it is today. While PICKY, the rooftop tea room furnished with amazing art pieces which overlooks the neighbourhood, is another must-see.

Multi-faceted art hubs

Head to M+ in the West Kowloon Cultural District to immerse yourself in visual culture

If you’re more of a wanderer than a gallery peruser, you’re in luck. Whole districts have been transformed into evolving, multi-faceted art hubs perfect for being explored at a leisurely pace. The West Kowloon Cultural District has become one of Hong Kong’s most significant cultural projects; 40 hectares of art-driven space, home to museums, performance venues and outdoor artistic recreation. Catch a contemporary dance performance at Freespace or an immersive Cantonese opera at Xiqu Centre before taking in the exhibitions at M+ and hitting Art Park in time for sunset.

Art-inspired eats

For dining with an arty aesthetic, head to Mott 32 in the Standard Chartered Bank Building

Occupying a more central position is H Queens, a 24-story pillar of arts and creation located at the intersection of Pottinger Street and Queen’s Road Central. Expect public galleries, pop-up exhibitions, group fitness and fine dining all permeated by an electric sense of creativity and artistic pursuit.

And if art-inspired dining has your interest piqued, round off your trip with a table at Mott 32 in the Standard Chartered Bank Building – the interior of which, designed by Joyce Wang, resembles an industrial boudoir and is considered a work of art in itself. The cocktail menu reads like an apothecary’s shopping list (vanilla infused macchu pisco, lychee, chili, lemon, flower) and the dim sum is notoriously good.

For must-try experiences and more inspiration, visit DiscoverHongKong.com/UK/explore/arts

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