Arts and Entertainment

With its satisfyingly fat vinyl platters, audiophile-friendly downloads and imaginative catalogue of rediscovered gems (plus new recordings), LP specialist Gearbox is becoming one of the wonders of the age.

The Orb enjoys new found fame as they collaborate with Pink Floyd's David Gilmour

Alex Paterson has every right to sound slightly tetchy as he points out: "You've ignored us for years, but suddenly everyone's interested just because of who we're working with." His ambient-house pioneers The Orb have been treated as whimsical irrelevances for much of their career; now they're getting to work with one of their heroes and the world is sitting up and listening. Paterson's latest album is Metallic Spheres, by The Orb featuring David Gilmour. The chill-out mavens have been paying tribute to Pink Floyd since their 1991 debut album The Orb's Adventures Beyond the Ultraworld, with its Battersea Power Station cover and a track called "Back Side of the Moon". Now they have worked the guitarist and vocalist's precise, bluesy style into their own dubby excursions.

The Tangerine dream team's next trick is to win at the Bridge

Newcastle United 0 Blackpool 2

Album: Steve Reich, Double Sextet/2x5 (Nonesuch)

Doubled-up instrumentation is the theme here: both "Double Sextet" (performed here by eighth blackbird) and "2x5" (by Bang on a Can) are designed for twin ensembles of six and five pieces, respectively. In both, the parts can be played simultaneously, or by a sextet/quintet playing alongside a pre-recorded tape of itself.

Album: S. Carey, All We Grow (Jagjaguwar)

C W Stoneking is a one-off eccentric of the first order, a 21st-century Australian white man who presents himself, colouration excepted, as a black American minstrel from a century earlier.

Album: Neu!, Neu! '86 (Gronland)

It says "rock" up there, but let's not be coy: this is what used to be known as "krautrock", with all its strange, formalist, concretised and alienating precepts about noise and noise's relationship with music.

Album: NEU! Neu! '86, (Grönland)

Compiled by Michael Rother from material previously released without his knowledge by Klaus Dinger on a Japanese label in 1995, the primary interest in Neu! '86 is as a measure of the fractious relations between the pair, whose divergent interests could no longer be reconciled by the time they re-formed Neu! for the third time to record these riffs.

Album: Laurie Anderson, Homeland (Nonesuch)

Anderson's first studio album in 10 years is one to divide opinion – either enough to induce "stultifying boredom" (the NME) or one that makes her "the most important multimedia artist of our time" (The LA Times).

Album: Espen Eriksen Trio, You Had Me at Goodbye (RG)

This tasteful, ambient-friendly Norwegian piano trio offers an accessible, slightly poppy update on the examples of Tord Gustavsen and EST.

Metal Machine Trio, Royal Festival Hall, London

Jez Butterworth's must-see play, Jerusalem, ends with its central character, Johnny "Rooster" Byron, banging on a drum and calling on the spirits of the forest to defend him against approaching bulldozers, which symbolise the encroaching modern world. It is a primal, feral and stirring moment. The same could be said of the sight of a worryingly frail-looking Lou Reed banging repeatedly on a huge gong.

Album: Neil Cowley Trio, Radio Silence (Naim)

There's nothing wrong with this third album by the likeable NCT but all the principal ingredients – pianism in the grand manner, catchy hooks, minimal improvisation – were already present in the previous two, and it's hard to say they've really been improved upon.

The Word On... Liars, Sisterworld

"Liars' usual creeping unease turns seductive —the increasingly rational voice of the inner psychopath... also ranks among Liars' poppiest. It compacts the band's ambient sprawl and mantra-like rhythms into recognisable song structures, even rocking out." - avclub.com

Osibisa, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Although the general consensus is that Osibisa did World music before World music, this firecracker of a gig makes another, more important point. The band founded in London by Ghanaian multi-instrumentalist Teddy Osei some four decades ago was part of a rich crop of late 60s combos that collapsed the boundaries between African music, funk, rock and jazz, so inventively that the resulting "fusion" could sound remarkably different from one track to the next. Comprising horns, percussion, electric rhythm section and lead vocals supplied by various members, Osibisa have a rich, rotund groove that, when galvanised by Wendell Richardson's growling lead guitar, loosely recalls the Chicano blues of Santana, no more so than on "Sunshine Day", whose joyous chorus is taken up by the whole audience straight from the downbeat. Elsewhere, the lithe, fluid hi-life pulse of West Africa is liberally deployed to inject an entirely different energy and the skipping, vaulting rhythms that mark the middle of the set prove an invitation to dance that even those suffering from mid-winter lethargy can't resist.

Album: Terry Riley, In C, (Sony)

Less polished than Steve Reich's Music for 18 Musicians (1974), In C remains the most iconic example of early minimalism. As the liner notes for this digitally remastered 1968 Carnegie Hall recording say, the work is "a trip", its performers "a weird zoo".

Album: Terry Riley, In C (Sony Classical)

Reissued to celebrate its 40th anniversary, Terry Riley's In C not only remains one of the keystone works of minimalism, but – unlike many pieces in that style – has actually grown in stature: what was once considered a strange experiment now stands as a landmark of 20th century music.

Album: Katia et Marielle Labèque, Erik Satie (KML)

The Labèque sisters here offer a blend of Satie's work for both two and four hands, with the solo pieces divvied up according to compatability.

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Prices correct as of 17 October 2014
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James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

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New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

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Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

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Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

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