Extras

There are so many options for transporting your little one. For any parents wanting to get out and about (and even on hols) without too much gear, we’ve got strollers covered

SQUEALS-ON-WHEELS

With such a vast array of baby transport in the shops, it's easy to get taken for a ride. Our panel gets pushy

In search of the british housewife

Last week she was declared officially extinct by the advertising industry. But, Emma Cook discovers, reports of her demise have been greatly exaggerated

The woman behind the text

THE HOUSE GUEST by Barbara Anderson Cape pounds 14.99

Pram collection outgrows its parental home

CLARE GARNER

Girl, 3, is youngest member of Mensa

JOJO MOYES

16 years old, three children, no regrets

Don't tell Dawn Hendy that she's missing out on the best years of her life. She's perfectly happy looking after her family. Roger Dobson reports

Their England

Empire lives on in Wandsworth

Boots disappoints market with poor start to sales

SHARES in Boots, the chemist group, which also owns Halfords and Childrens World, fell 23.5p to 522p yesterday as first-quarter sales figures disappointed the City, writes Heather Connon.

Baby 'poisoned'

A cleaner at Heatherwood Hospital in Ascot, Berkshire, has been suspended pending an inquiry after poisonous dishwasher powder found its way by accident into the feeding bottle of a one-year-old girl awaiting a liver transplant.

ART / Modern Icons: Croquet: The Irish artist Dorothy Cross 'invites' her viewers to play croquet with cows' udders

I've been working with udders for about two years now. The idea is simple. It's about disruption. I'm interested in the way that the cow is reduced to nothing more than a milk- producing machine, an udder, a ball. An udder has four teats and reduces down to four individual balls. Croquet seemed an obvious metaphor. It's the only sport that uses four balls of that size. It was a happy coincidence. The big ball is a 'mother' ball with four teats but the others, although they only have one teat each, are also complete within themselves. A single teat is both phallic and a nipple. Because of the reduction they can now fit through the hoops. They can participate in a convention which isn't progressive. A new breed infiltrating the game of conformity. It looks like the game is in progress but you know that, if you played it, it would create havoc. It wouldn't be the nice civilised game that croquet is meant to be.

THE FRINGE / Gold in small quantities

Some play titles seem so tenuously related to the events on stage that they appear to have been attached by accident. Not so Resolution, the new play by Murray Gold at BAC. The word 'Resolution' dissects the white set in huge black letters and, within minutes of the play's opening, two lovers are flipping definitions back and forth like a ping pong ball: 'I admire your resolution'; 'I have made a resolution not to love you'; 'I hope we reach a happy resolution'.

Letter: Short cuts to bottle feeding

IF WE are concerned about the decline of breastfeeding, we have to look at where 'failures' begin - in the maternity ward.

MOTORING / High chairs and holidays competition winners

The answers to the questions in the competition that we ran on page 60 of our 6 March issue were:

TRIED & TESTED / Safe and sound: Baby monitors promise peace of mind to all anxious parents. Our expert panel investigates the claims

Parents anxious to keep an eye on their baby at all times can now buy home TV-monitor systems like those used by security guards. But a much cheaper and more common device to bring peace of mind is the baby monitor, a radio that transmits the sound of the baby's crying to parents who are out of earshot. The most important difference between types of monitor is whether they are portable or not: some must be plugged into wall sockets while others run on batteries. You pay more for models where both parents' and baby's units are battery-run but they give you much more flexibility. There is a certain Squidgy factor to baby monitors. If you're not careful what you say within range of the baby's unit, you risk having your innermost secrets broadcast to all your dinner guests downstairs - or even to other monitor owners in the street. Owners also report picking up ghostly sounds of other babies' crying. Only you can stop yourself being indiscreet, but some models have a two-channel switch, which gives you the option of switching to another frequency if there's any interference from neighbours' monitors. Another useful feature to look out for is a light display, triggered by sound, that can alert you to your baby's cries.

Letter: First with family dining

AN OMISSION in your article 'High-chairs and holidays' (Review, 6 March) has left me bewildered and angry. Your sub-headline goes on to read '100 top entries in an Egon Ronay guide to places where children are welcome'. How then do you come to ignore Smollensky's restaurants, originators of and undisputed market leaders of family dining?
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones