Tour de France 2022 stage-by-stage guide, route maps and profiles

The 2022 Tour de France begins in Copenhagen and finishes in Paris, via the Alps and the Pyrenees

<p>Stage 12 features the iconic Alpe d’Huez climb </p>

Stage 12 features the iconic Alpe d’Huez climb

The 2022 Tour de France begins in Copenhagen on Friday 1 July and finishes in Paris on Sunday 24 July, where Slovenian superstar Tadej Pogacar hopes to be wearing yellow and be crowned champion for the third year in a row.

Standing in his way is the sheer strength and depth of Dutch team Jumbo-Visma, who carry multiple threats including Pogacar’s national teammate Primoz Roglic and last year’s Tour runner-up, Jonas Vingegaard. Ineos Grenadiers are without their leading light Egan Bernal, the 2019 champion who is still recovering from injury, but they do have the in-form Geraint Thomas fresh from winning the Tour de Suisse, as well as potential stage winners Adam Yates and Tom Pidcock.

Here is a stage-by-stage look at this year’s route.

Stage 1, Friday 1 July: individual time trial, Copenhagen, 13.2km

Stage 1 map

The Tour usually begins on Saturday but the transfer from this year’s opening three stages in Copenhagen to northern France means an early rest day and a Friday start to accommodate it. A flat time trial through the streets of Copenhagen opens the show with plenty of intricate tight corners, but given it is only over 13km there shouldn’t be huge time gaps created among the leaders. Even so, the pure climbers will be conscious to minimise losses here.

Stage 1 report: Yves Lampaert claims surprise win on opening Tour de France stage in wet Copenhagen

Stage 1 profile

Stage 2, Saturday 2 July: Roskilde-Nyborg, 202.5km

Stage 2 map

This long stage could prove pivotal as the peloton traces Denmark’s northern coastline, where crosswinds could split the pack and put a serious dent in the hopes of those on the wrong side. Three categorised climbs feature in the middle of the stage before what is set to be a spectacular finale across the Great Belt Bridge.

Stage 2 report: Fabio Jakobsen claims maiden Tour de France stage win after chaotic finish on day two

Stage 2 profile

Stage 3, Sunday 3 July: Vejle-Sonderborg, 182km

Stage 3 map

Stage three looks like a classic breakaway day before a bunch sprint finish between the serious fast men, with the likes of Caleb Ewan (Lotto-Soudal), Fabio Jakobsen (Quickstep), Dylan Groenewegen (BikeExchange-Jayco) and Jasper Philipsen (Alpecin-Fenix) sharpening their elbows as they battle for the win. It closes out the Danish jaunt before a transfer day to France.

Stage 3 profile

Stage 3 report: Dylan Groenewegen wins photo finish in Sonderborg as Wout van Aert keeps yellow

Stage 4, Tuesday 5 July: Dunkirk-Calais, 171.5km

Stage 4 map

The first stage in France couldn’t get much close to Britain, and fans might take the opportunity to nip across the Channel. There are five category four climbs dotted through the stage but nothing sharp enough to deter the sprinters, so long as they can keep up with any early breakaway. Strong winds could be a factor, too.

Stage 4 profile

Stage 4 report: Wout van Aert surges to victory with brilliant solo ride to Calais

Stage 5, Wednesday 6 July: Lille-Arenberg Porte du Hainault, 157km

Stage 5 map

This is the Paris-Roubaix stage, with 19km of cobbles across 11 perilous sections towards the end of a hilly day which are likely to claim a few injuries but could also offer up a chance to attack for those brave enough to try it. A one-day classics master like Mathieu van der Poel could thrive in these kind of conditions.

Stage 5 profile

Report: Tadej Pogacar hurts Jumbo-Visma rivals as Simon Clarke wins on the cobbles

Stage 6, Thursday 7 July: Binche-Longwy, 220km

Stage 6 map

A lumpy finish to this stage will knock any sprinters out of contention and offer up the win to anyone brave enough to speed down the descent from the category three Cote de Pulventeux which lurks close to the end of what will be a long day. A day for a breakaway artist, perhaps? Peter Sagan won in Longwy in 2017.

Stage 6 profile

Stage 6 report:Tadej Pogacar takes yellow jersey from Wout van Aert

Stage 7, Friday 8 July: Tomblaine-La Planche des Belles Filles, 176.5km

Stage 7 map

The first mountain-top finish is a modern Tour de France classic: La Planche des Belle Filles, where Chris Froome won in 2012 and Tadej Pogacar took control of the 2020 edition. “The Plank” gets steeper as it rises, finishing on a 24% gradient, and by the end of a gruelling day we will have a good idea of who, if anyone, can challenge Pogacar for his crown.

Stage 7 profile

Stage 7 report:Tadej Pogacar turns the screw on rivals with dramatic win atop La Planche

Stage 8, Saturday 9 July: Dole-Lausanne, 186.5km

Stage 8 map

Another day for the puncheurs like Van der Poel – and one Julian Alaphilippe would have loved had he been fit for this Tour. The three categorised climbs, the sharp descent from Col de Petra Felix all leading to an uphill finish: this day will have been earmarked in the schedule by those teams chasing hilly stage wins.

Stage 8 profile

Stage 8 report:Wout van Aert takes stage eight Tour glory as Tadej Pogacar extends lead

Stage 9, Sunday 10 July: Aigle-Chatel, 193km

Stage 9 map

The first proper mountain stage heads to Switzerland where a couple of category one climbs await. If a break stays clear then someone with strong climbing legs can get the job done, but they will also need good technical skills on the fast descents – Ineos’s Adam Yates could be a contender.

Stage 9 profile

Stage 9 report:Bob Jungels holds off Thibaut Pinot charge to claim first career Tour de France stage win

Stage 10, Tuesday 12 July: Morzine-Megeve, 148.5km

Stage 10 map

After the second rest day, the peloton returns to a familiar route from Morzine to Megeve via another dip into Switzerland which is likely to be contested by a breakaway, with the main GC contenders conserving energy for the intimidating days ahead.

Stage 10 profile

Stage 10 report:Magnus Cort wins stage 1 as Tadej Pogacar retains yellow

Stage 11, Wednesday 13 July: Albertville-Col du Granon, 152km

Stage 11 map

An eyewatering route for riders but a mouthwatering day in store for fans, as three tough climbs await at the second half of the stage which could provide a platform in the clouds for a battle between the general classification contenders. The Col du Telegraphe (11.9 km, 7.1%), Col du Galibier (17.7km, 6.9%) and Col du Granon (11.3 km, 9.2%) will drain even strong legs and, if he’s feeling fresh, Pogacar could chose this moment to hurt his rivals. The Galibier marks the highest point of the race at 2,642m, and the first man over will win the Souvenir Henri Desgrange.

Stage 11 profile

Stage 12, Thursday 14 July: Briançon-Alpe d’Huez, 165.5km

Stage 12 map

On Bastille Day, French fans will be hoping one of their men can deliver on the iconic Alpe d’Huez. Thibaut Pinot and David Gaudu, both of Groupama-FDJ, are the most likely French hopes but any one of the big GC contenders could make their move here on what will be a memorable day.

Stage 12 profile

Stage 13, Friday 15 July, Bourg d’Oisans-Saint Etienne, 193km

Stage 13 map

A transition from the Alps to the Massif hills which should open opportunities for those who have punching power in the legs as well as a sharp sprint finish for what is a flat run into the line.

Stage 13 profile

Stage 13 report:Mads Pedersen clinches victory in Mende

Stage 14, Saturday 16 July: Saint Étienne-Mende, 192.5km

Stage 14 map

Another hilly day but some slightly more demanding climbs should see the stage victory fall into the hands of a fast rider who is not a pure sptinter. A day that is unlikely to shake up the main general classification contenders.

Stage 14 profile

Stage 14 report: Michael Matthews wins in St Etienne

Stage 15, Sunday 17 July: Rodez-Carcassonne, 202.5km

Stage 15 map

An in-between stage which will be perfectly set up for the sprinters should they still be in the Tour and should they reach the finish in contention. But the various hilly sections could still be enough to keep the fast men at bay and offer the win to a breakaway group.

Stage 15 profile

Stage 15 report: Costly day for Jonas Vingegaard as Jasper Philipsen wins stage 15

Stage 16, Tuesday 19 July: Carcassonne-Foix, 178.5km

Stage 16 map

The first stage of the Pyrenees is not too brutal and may not elicit much action at the top of the general classification. Instead it is likely to serve up a battle for the stage victory which will suit a skilful climber like Romain Bardet, if their GC ambitions allow them to escape up the road from the yellow jersey group.

Stage 16 profile

Stage 16 report:Hugo Houle wins emotional stage 16 in Foix

Stage 17, Wednesday 20 July: Saint Gaudens-Peyragudes, 130km

Stage 17 map

Four categorised climbs culminate atop Peyragudes where there could be a fight for crucial yellow jersey seconds at the finish. The likes of Pogacar, Thomas and Vingegaard could all win a demanding stage like this one and make their mark on the general classification battle.

Stage 17 report: Tadej Pogacar edges sprint but Jonas Vingegaard protects yellow jersey lead

Stage 17 profile

Stage 18, Thursday 21 July: Lourdes-Hautacam, 143.2km

Stage 18 map

Not a long route but three gruelling climbs including the hors categorie Col d’Aubisque and a summit finish. It looks built for another GC battle and the winner here is probably taking hold of the yellow jersey until Paris, if they were not already wearing it.

Stage 18 preview: Tadej Pogacar and Jonas Vingegaard set for decisive final mountain duel

Stage 18 map

Stage 19, Friday 22 July: Castelnau-Magnoac-Cahors, 188.5km

Stage 19 map

A penultimate day for the sprinters, which will be well-earned for those fast men who have made it through the Alps and Pyrenees. The main GC contenders will look to conserve energy and their bodies for the decisive time trial to follow.

Stage 19 profile

Stage 20, Saturday 23 July: Lacapelle Marival-Rocamadour individual time trial, 40.7km

Stage 20 map

It may all be a formality by this point with a chunky advantage for the overall leader already assured, but if the GC is tight enough then it will all come down to this: 40.7km, a long indivudal time trial with a couple of testing hills. The stage 20 ITT has become a regular feature over the past few years and threw up a dramatic finale in 2020 when Roglic suffered and Pogacar powered to victory. Organisers will hope for more of the same.

Stage 20 profile

Stage 21, Sunday 24 July: Paris La Defense-Champs Elysees, 116km

Stage 21 map

The procession to the centre of Paris, where the jersey winners will be crowned and the sprinters will get one final contest for the prestige of victory on the Champs-Elysees. Oh how Mark Cavendish would have loved to add to his collection of wins here.

Stage 21 profile

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