Sean O'Grady: We are supposed to worship brutality

Once my city boasted Roman walls, medieval halls and Georgian terraces

Manolo Blahnik Drawings

They look like cherries on the twig, fluttering ribbons, anti-vandal spikes, a moebius strip, a chequer board, bracelets, a cockatoo, raspberry canes, dandelions clocks. They simultaneously incapacitate and empower. Amanda Harlech writes about "the complex surgery that lifts and angles the foot so you walk as a dream of yourself."

First Impressions: Brideshead Revisited, Granada (1981)

It must, I feel sure, have been Evelyn Waugh who said you should always think of those less fortunate than yourself. How much more entertaining for most of us to think of those more fortunate than ourselves getting it in the neck. Brideshead Revisited seems likely to be an abiding delight, not just because the noble house of Marchmain get what is coming to them, but because it is a book of great splendour, splendidly done. I am particularly grateful to John Mortimer, who adapted the book, for his remarkable fidelity to Waugh. I noticed only one ripple of Rumpole. "There is no Mrs Lunt," said Mr Lunt, with notable satisfaction.

'I didn't get where I am today by missing a sequel,' says Perrin creator

'The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin' was a massive success for writer David Nobbs in the 1970s. He explains why it is back from the dead

The Opposite Bastard, By Simon Packham

A ghastly cast of oddballs makes a seductive read

Brian Viner: Courgettes were never far from my mind

Country Life: 'When I used to spend the summer in Cornwall I never had the same level of vegetable separation anxiety'

Lucerne Festival Orchestra / Abbado, Lucerne Festival, Lucerne

Slow-moving woodwinds etched out Debussy's "Nuages", the first of his Trois Nocturnes, slowly but surely pulling focus on the festival's opening concert. It's something of a paradox that Debussy's brand of impressionism demands absolute clarity – and the medieval city's handsome concert hall delivers it, blending and delineating to perfection.

Sweet pickings: Skye Gyngell's berry desserts

The great British berry harvest is in full swing – and with little effort, says Skye Gyngell, the fruits of our forests become the taste of the summer

Blackcurrant jelly

Serves 6

Take a walk in the Brecon Beacons

Foodies are taking to the Welsh hills to follow a tasty trail of home-grown produce and gently reared meat. Kieran Falconer burns off the calories in the Brecon Beacons

Cranachan with raspberries

Serves 4

The Weasel: Breaking the mould

Even though its infamous wobbliness is now firmly held in check, Lord Foster's Millennium Bridge continues to attract critical scrutiny. "How did they get it to stand up?" inquired a dubious Mrs W. "It must have been very stiff. A bit chewy I imagine." She had a point. The single-span crossing demands considerable material resilience. This is exactly what you want in a bridge, though it is rarely desirable in a raspberry jelly. It must be admitted that Mrs W's critique did not concern the "Blade of Light" as such. Her views were prompted by a gelatinous model of the structure from Foster & Partners. Apparently moulded in raspberry jelly (though it might have been the less satisfying strawberry version), it was one of the finalists in a jelly competition organised for the London Festival of Architecture, which runs until 20 July. Following an auction, successful bidders were able to spoon up all 10 on the short-list, including jellies of Nicholas Grimshaw's Eden Project and Richard Rogers's terminal at Madrid Airport.

Pocket Money: My son's learning the value of money – the hard way

now, i'm no economics expert (what do you mean, you could tell?) but seeing the headlines earlier this week made me feel slightly, how shall I put it, on top of events. "Britain declares war on food waste" was how Monday's Independent expressed the current furore over our cavalier attitude to produce, especially when prices are rising.

Chambord Presse

Serves 4

Jelly: Yearlstone and raspberry jelly

Serves 4

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