News French President Francois Hollande and Julie Gayet

Closer magazine said the 41-year-old actress had first been introduced to Mr Hollande by his former partner Ségolène Royal

`Love Story' ends in tears for Al Gore

It was the perfect ruse for adding a touch of romance to a charisma- challenged Vice-President with higher ambitions, and for seven days it had all of Washington in a tizzy. Was it to take seriously Al Gore's claim, as reported by Time magazine last Monday, that he and his wife, Tipper, were the inspiration for Hollywood's most famous tearjerker, Love Story?

Choice: Discussion: Closer, National Theatre

Closer, National Theatre, London SE1 (0171-928 2252) 10pm

Books: Inspiring lesson of les miserables

VICTOR HUGO by Graham Robb, Picador pounds 20

Romeo gets that sinking feeling

You can tell from his films that Leonardo DiCaprio likes a challenge. But was `Titanic' a trip too far?

Television: Rugged heroes with burn-out syndrome

There are three books that all educated young Englishwomen are supposed to have read by the time they fall into the arms of the man they are to marry (or they take their A- levels): Little Women, Rebecca and Jane Eyre. The last two have both been televised by ITV this year, and Little Women cannot be far behind.

HYPE ALERT

Ethan Hawke, the 24-year old star of the impossibly beguiling Before Sunrise, has his first novel published on Monday by Flamingo Press. The Hottest State is about a young actor and his experiences of love, loss and rejection. Statements claiming coincidental resemblance between author and subject will doubtless follow forthwith.

Film: Hardier than the rest, JUDE Michael Winterbottom (15)

This is not pretty costume drama. It's tragic, raw and brutal. As it should be. By Adam Mars-Jones

TWENTYSOMETHING

Not yet 21, Kate Winslet is established as Hollywood's favourite young British actor. She still can't believe her luck

Graves, the new destination

Should we go sightseeing at the Titanic? Godfrey Hodgson asks when we may break an ancient taboo

'It would be cheaper to lower the Atlantic'

(So said Lew Grade in 1979. Yesterday the pounds 3.3m operation to rais e the Titanic was abandoned)

Music on Radio: The age of innocence;

If music is a real concern, there can be few more revealing experiences than switching on the radio in the middle of a fascinating piece one has never heard, only to discover at the end that it is by a composer one thought one loathed. Back in the 1970s, Radio 3 actually used to connive at such epiphanies with a series entitled The Innocent Ear, devised and usually introduced by Robert Simpson. Programmes generally comprised two or three complete works in contrasting forms and styles, about which listeners were told in advance no more than what they were scored for and how long they lasted. The object, Simpson would reiterate, was not to guess the composer - though it was always difficult to refrain from trying to - but to listen with ears uncorrupted by preconceptions. There must, indeed, be not a few who remain lastingly grateful for some discovery or other when Mr Simpson revealed all at the end of each broadcast, and who would welcome a return of the Innocent Ear idea.

CLASSIC FILM COLLECTION

Old gold: a film buff's guide to On Golden Pond

Self-loathing in Las Vegas

A brilliant film, a hymn to self-destructiveness: Mike Figgis is back and on form.

CAGED HEAT

After years of 'wacko Method masochism', Nicolas Cage is being tipped for an Oscar. David Thomson talked to him

THE FILM FIRST KNIGHT

Julia Ormond meets Richard Gere en route to marrying Sean Connery courtesy of Camelot. Not the lottery you understand, we're talking the Round Table. King Arthur meets the director of Ghost and the writer of Shadowlands - together they dream up a truly terrible title.
News
A 1930 image of the Karl Albrecht Spiritousen and Lebensmittel shop, Essen. The shop was opened by Karl and Theo Albrecht’s mother; the brothers later founded Aldi
people
Arts and Entertainment
Standing the test of time: Michael J Fox and Christopher Lloyd in 'Back to the Future'
filmA cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
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Flora Spencer-Longhurst as Lavinia, William Houston as Titus Andronicus and Dyfan Dwyfor as Lucius
theatreThe Shakespeare play that proved too much for more than 100 people
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exclusivePunk icon Viv Albertine on Sid Vicious, complacent white men, and why free love led to rape
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Stir crazy: Noel Fielding in 'Luxury Comedy 2: Tales from Painted Hawaii'
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Flow chart: Karl Landsteiner discovered blood types in 1900, yet scientists have still not come up with an explanation for their existence
lifeAll of us have one. Yet even now, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
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'Weird Al' Yankovic, or Alfred Matthew, at the 2014 Los Angeles Film Festival Screening of
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New Real Madrid signing James Rodríguez with club president Florentino Perez
sportColombian World Cup star completes £63m move to Spain
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Hotel Tour d’Auvergne in Paris launches pay-what-you-want
travelIt seems fraught with financial risk, but the policy has its benefits
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy': A land of the outright bizarre

Noel Fielding's 'Luxury Comedy'

A land of the outright bizarre
What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

What are the worst 'Word Crimes'?

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic's latest video is an ode to good grammar. But what do The Independent’s experts think he’s missed out?
Can Secret Cinema sell 80,000 'Back to the Future' tickets?

The worst kept secret in cinema

A cult movie event aims to immerse audiences of 80,000 in ‘Back to the Future’. But has it lost its magic?
Facebook: The new hatched, matched and dispatched

The new hatched, matched and dispatched

Family events used to be marked in the personal columns. But now Facebook has usurped the ‘Births, Deaths and Marriages’ announcements
Why do we have blood types?

Are you my type?

All of us have one but probably never wondered why. Yet even now, a century after blood types were discovered, it’s a matter of debate what they’re for
Honesty box hotels: You decide how much you pay

Honesty box hotels

Five hotels in Paris now allow guests to pay only what they think their stay was worth. It seems fraught with financial risk, but the honesty policy has its benefit
Commonwealth Games 2014: Why weight of pressure rests easy on Michael Jamieson’s shoulders

Michael Jamieson: Why weight of pressure rests easy on his shoulders

The Scottish swimmer is ready for ‘the biggest race of my life’ at the Commonwealth Games
Some are reformed drug addicts. Some are single mums. All are on benefits. But now these so-called 'scroungers’ are fighting back

The 'scroungers’ fight back

The welfare claimants battling to alter stereotypes
Amazing video shows Nasa 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action

Fireballs in space

Amazing video shows Nasa's 'flame extinguishment experiment' in action
A Bible for billionaires

A Bible for billionaires

Find out why America's richest men are reading John Brookes
Paranoid parenting is on the rise - and our children are suffering because of it

Paranoid parenting is on the rise

And our children are suffering because of it
For sale: Island where the Magna Carta was sealed

Magna Carta Island goes on sale

Yours for a cool £4m
Phone hacking scandal special report: The slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

The hacker's tale: the slide into crime at the 'News of the World'

Glenn Mulcaire was jailed for six months for intercepting phone messages. James Hanning tells his story in a new book. This is an extract
We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

We flinch, but there are degrees of paedophilia

Child abusers are not all the same, yet the idea of treating them differently in relation to the severity of their crimes has somehow become controversial
The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

The truth about conspiracy theories is that some require considering

For instance, did Isis kill the Israeli teenagers to trigger a war, asks Patrick Cockburn