Life and Style

Night In

Wines of the Week: Terry Kirby selects the best bottles for Christmas Day

It is the day before Christmas Eve and too late to order your festive wines online. So here are three versatile, value-for-money bottles you can find in a quick tour of your local high-street stores.

Wine: Something for the weekend

Night in

Anthony Rose: 'Food and wine matching can be taken with a decent pinch of salt'

Food and wine matching is neither an art nor a science and much of the time it can be taken with a decent pinch of salt. It was brought home to me having recently returned from China where restaurant customers knocked back wines that Western sommeliers would demand marriages for in heaven. No one dish resembles another. Our own likes and dislikes apart, the quality of the raw materials, the seasoning, saucing and spicing, are simply too varied to suit a one-wine-fits-all formula.

Wine: Crowd pleasers for Christmas

A taste of wine is worth 100 ads. So it proved with the wine walks which are consistently one of the most popular features of the Wine Gang's Christmas tastings in London, Edinburgh and Bath. Groups of 10 wine consumers go walkabout with a member of the Wine Gang, stopping at different exhibitors to taste and talk about a wine. The interaction gives everyone the chance to taste wines normally outside their comfort or shopping zones and it gives the five members of the Wine Gang invaluable feedback as to consumer preferences.

Theo Walcott is treated after colliding with Aldo Simoncini

Glenn Moore: Only winners in pointless games like these are the suits at Uefa

When park players are allowed to mix with elite footballers, people get hurt

Taittinger: 'a great servant of the state and a great entrepreneur'

Jean Taittinger: Champagne scion who transformed Reims

The businessman and politician Jean Taittinger played a major part in transforming Reims from a city trading on its rich history and its traditional role as one of the three centres for champagne production, alongside Épernay and Ay, into a dynamic regional capital. The irony was that the man who served as mayor of Reims between 1959 and 1977, was a member of French Parliament for the Marne department from 1958 to 1974, and Secretary of State for Finance, Minister of Justice and Minister of State from 1971 to 1974 under President Georges Pompidou, belonged to a family associated with one of the grandes marques.

Wine: Something for the weekend

Night in

Wine: Something for the weekend

Night in

Being Modern: Gourmet crisps

What colour have you got? Red? EURGH! I've got my blue ones, and I ain't givin' you any. That, at least, is representative of a typical breaktime conversation at my primary school, a few decades ago. And it hardly needs a semiotician to break it down: red equals ready salted equals not enough flavour equals EURGH! Blue equals either salt and vinegar (Golden Wonder) or cheese and onion (Walkers, which, for reasons unfathomable, switched the universally held acceptance that green was cheesy and blue was salty), which equals yum, and you ain't havin' any.

Wine: Something for the weekend?

Night in

Anthony Rose: 'There are excellent co-operatives producing quality wines throughout France'

Bastille Day: an opportunity to arm yourself with a bottle in celebration of the revolutionary fraternity of that horny-handed son of the terroir, the French vigneron. The Gironde was once the breeding ground of the counter-revolution and the Bordeaux château remains today a symbol of capitalist enterprise. The French co-operative movement, in contrast, bands together groups of like-minded individuals with small vineyard parcels.

Wine: Something for the weekend?

Couch potato

Wine: Something for the weekend?

Couch potato

The party line: Ann Widdecombe

The Week In Radio: The spirit sinks as Widdy has one too many whines

Has there ever been a more glorious title for a programme as Radio 5 Live's Drunk Again: Ann Widdecombe Investigates? Prior to listening, I had visions of Britain's newest national treasure three sheets to the wind, wobbling out of a Wetherspoon in mini-dress and heels at one in the morning, and trying to snog a policeman.

Spring garden salad

Spring garden salad

Serves 4

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