Life and Style

Night In

The Blagger's Guide To...Reading Force

How books can bring families closer together

Letter from the editor: 100 issues old today

Sam Roberts, with a six-word text, summed up the feelings of i readers up and down the country.

Letter from the editor: A landmark in our fledgling history

Tomorrow i passes 100. We don’t expect to get a telegram from the Queen, nor even a polite round of applause for hitting a century, but it’s another landmark in our fledgling history and one which gives us another reason (or is it excuse?) to crack open the Chardonnay.

Anthony Rose: 'It seems as if the northern and southern hemispheres have become parallel but separate worlds'

When I was first getting to grips with wine in the dim and distant past, I never had the benefit of appreciating wine by grape variety. Wine was all about location, as the name on the bottle indicated: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Rhône and so on. Since the New World was never hamstrung by the pedigree of location or brand, it turned the label upside down and opted for all those grape varieties it had pinched from Bordeaux, Burgundy, Rhône and elsewhere.

Leading article: Grape expectations

Picture the scene in a few years: a jolly party in full swing. Anyone fancy some Chinese? No, it's not takeaway sweet-and-sour that these festive revellers will be talking about, but wine.

Wagstaff ploughs Venture pay-off into British sparkling wine

Mike Wagstaff has ploughed some of the near-£20m he made from the sale of Venture Production into creating "one of the finest sparkling wines in the UK".

Anthony Rose: 'Riesling scores handsomely over chardonnay in its versatility'

If I had £1 for every time I read that the riesling revival was just around the corner, I'd be laughing. And if I were a rich man, I'd fill my cellar with 2009 German riesling. In fact, compared to extravagantly priced 2009 Bordeaux, current offers of 2009 German riesling look positively cheap. Places such as Alsace, Austria, Australia and New Zealand are spearheading the current riesling revival.

Anthony Rose: You can now put Spar's wines on your dinner table without attracting a derisory snort from your guests

Laura Jewell likes the expression "does what it says on the tin". That's because, since she joined Spar as their wine buyer a year ago, she's been busy re-vamping the range with wines that do a job at the price. Spar, which opened for business in the UK in 1967, is possibly not the first wine port of call for Independent readers. Toilet rolls perhaps; in fact anything you might drop into the local store for on your way home. But wine?

Lotta Bottle: The best summer wines

From elegant rieslings to succulent reds for the barbecue...

Size really matters: Why matching the wine glass to the grape is crucial

Kate Hilpern has her tastebuds taken by surprise

Anthony Rose: 'The first group in the Australian Chardonnay tasting failed to set the pulse racing'

Wine of Australia put on a blind tasting of 50 "world class" chardonnays at this year's annual tasting. Why chardonnay? Well, Australian chardonnay is big business. Of the top 10 most popular chardonnays in the UK, the top four are Aussie: Hardy's, Jacobs Creek, Lindemans and a supermarket own-label (Tesco's presumably). As liked as they may be, no one would pretend that these four are world-class. So we were being asked whether the claim that Australian chardonnay has evolved into a plethora of styles at different levels of quality, holds good.

Anthony Rose: 'A strong euro and a burgeoning global market could make life difficult for those with a limited wine budget'

Stargazers are two a penny at this time of year, but predicting 2010's wine trends need not be a total mug's game. To look forward in wine – reculer pour mieux sauter, as the French would have it – is the way. One of the big events this year, for instance, is likely to be the sale of Bordeaux 2009 vintage this spring. Bordeaux predictions should be taken with a larger than usual pinch of salt, but after three average years since the great 2005 vintage, reliable noises coming out of the region suggest that 2009 could rank alongside 2005. As ever, price will be the key. A strong euro and a burgeoning global market fuelled by new Asian wealth could make life difficult for those of us with an honest interest in – but limited budget for – great claret.

The wine-lover's dream – in the suburbs of Paris

The hills around the French capital were once famed for their vintages. Now one small vineyard which has survived the urban sprawl is in need of an expert to run it
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent
Markus Persson: If being that rich is so bad, why not just give it all away?

That's a bit rich

The billionaire inventor of computer game Minecraft says he is bored, lonely and isolated by his vast wealth. If it’s that bad, says Simon Kelner, why not just give it all away?
Euro 2016: Chris Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Coleman on course to end half a century of hurt for Wales

Wales last qualified for major tournament in 1958 but after several near misses the current crop can book place at Euro 2016 and end all the indifference
Rugby World Cup 2015: The tournament's forgotten XV

Forgotten XV of the rugby World Cup

Now the squads are out, Chris Hewett picks a side of stars who missed the cut
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests